What was the last record you bought on Vinyl, and when was that?

February 20, 2018

Would you enjoy becoming an Iron Man Records Patron? Do you like listening to music on Vinyl? Would you feel happy supporting the cause and contributing to the next release on Vinyl? Do you want to Immanentize the Eschaton? Are you a risk taker?

To be honest, I have NO idea what questions to ask or how much to ask for. What would you be able to give? It’s probably none of my business. Iron Man Records needs more Patrons and you’re exactly the sort of person. You’re even reading this stuff. We all spend money on nonsense. This is not nonsense. I would like to invite you to become a Patron. In exchange, I’d like to offer you a whole load of free stuff. Would $1 or £1 or €1 be something you’d be able to consider in your current financial circumstances?

Things are tough at this end. 31 Patrons, who already support the label, have overseen the release of Police Bastard – Confined on Vinyl, John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth on double CD and also Beatnik Youth Ambient on Vinyl. There’s more to follow. Are you a risk taker? Do you want to place a bet and have a laugh while helping out?

The general history of art and literature shows that the highest achievements of the human mind are, as a rule, not favourably received at first.

Iron Man Records has dedicated over 21 years to supporting, promoting, and working with, some of the most interesting artists you may never have heard of, sometimes with a budget you can stick under a glass.

November 2016 saw the release of Police Bastard – “Confined” on Vinyl.

One of CVLT Nation’s Top Crust Albums: “Thought-provoking monologues and confrontational lyrics bring you on a cold, doom-laden journey of perpetual war, psychological mind control and disillusionment.”

June 2017 saw the release of John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Vinyl.

Ambient, chill out music from the restless creative mind of Youth with spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

January 2018 saw the release of John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth” on CD.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation. A psychedelic poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution, John Sinclair’s mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers, Youth has also hand drawn the beautiful cover artwork for Beatnik Youth Ambient.

Take a risk, Become a Patron and enjoy supporting insanity. Incredible amounts of time, effort, and money has gone into making these records happen. Iron Man Records would like to invite you to give your support to the artists involved and their work.

Among the rewards, Patrons will get a copy of each release as soon as it is available and Patrons will get their names printed on the sleeve of all future releases generated with their help and support.

You have to build the world you want to live in, and while you may not want to consider running a record label yourself, you can directly influence what happens next.

Patrons enable Iron Man Records to continue the work supporting struggling artists and creatives.

Have fun, get involved.

If you want an alternative to what you see going on around you, you have to make it for yourself.

Let’s make something mad happen together https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

John Sinclair – Time Line from 1941 to 2018. A Life’s work to date…..

February 14, 2018

JOHN SINCLAIR Beatnik Youth - Portrait Photo

1941-1959

Born October 2 at Women’s Hospital, Flint, Michigan

Parents: John Sr. (Jack) and Elsie Sinclair

Sister Kathleen born 1943, brother David born 1945

Attended Davison Public Schools, Davison, Michigan 1959

1959-1964

Attended Albion College, Albion, Michigan, 1959-61

Attended Flint Junior College, 1961

Attended University of Michigan-Flint College. 1962-64

Editor, The Word, UM–Flint

President, UM—Flint Cinema Guild

Graduated UM-Flint, January 1964, A.B. English Literature

1964-67

Attended Wayne State University, Detroit, Graduate School of English

Master’s Thesis: William Burroughs’ Naked Lunch

Convicted of Marijuana Possession, Detroit Recorders Court,

Sentenced to two years probation

Co-Founder & Director, Detroit Artists Workshop

Founder & Director, Detroit LEMAR (Legalize Marijuana)

Editor & Publisher, Artists Workshop Press

Editor & Publisher, Warren-Forest Sun newspaper

Co-Founder & Director, WSU Artists’ Society

Detroit Correspondent, downbeat Magazine, Chicago

Married Magdalene Arndt, June 1965

Berkeley Poetry Conference. Four Young American Poets Reading

Convicted of Marijuana Possession, Detroit Recorders Court,

Sentenced to three years probation

Prisoner, Detroit House of Correction, February-August 1966

Co-Editor, Guerrilla: A Newspaper of Cultural Revolution, Detroit

Talent Consultant, Grande Ballroom, Detroit

Author, This Is Our Music, Artists Workshop Press

Author, FIRE MUSIC: a record, Artists Workshop Press

Author, The Poem For Warner Stringfellow, Artists Workshop Press

Author, “A New Song / For A New Year”, Artists Workshop Press Broadside

Author, “Sing The Song”, Artists Workshop Press Broadside

Author, “When A Man / Loves A Woman”, Fenian Head Centre Press Broadside)

Author, “Weathering”, Fenian Head Centre Press Broadside

Editor, Free Poems/Among Friends, Artists Workshop Press

Editor, Detroit Artists’ Worksheet, Artists Workshop Press

Editor (with Robin Eichele), Ten Wayne Poets, Wayne State University

Contributor, Hettie Jones, Editor, Poems Now, Kulchur Press

1967-1968

Artists’ Manager, MC-5

Producer, MC-5, “Looking At You”/”Borderline”, A-Square Records 45

Author, Meditations: A Suite For John Coltrane, Artists Workshop Press

Talent Consultant, Grande Ballroom, Detroit

President, Trans-Love Energies, Inc., Detroit > Ann Arbor

Daughter: Marion Sunny Sinclair, born May 4, 1967

Editor & Publisher, Ann Arbor Sun newspaper

Founder & Talent Coordinator, Free Concerts in the Parks

Columnist, San Francisco Oracle

Columnist, Ann Arbor Argus

Director, Free University of Ann Arbor

Founder, Minister of Information, Chairman, White Panther Party

Director, MC5, Kick Out The Jams promotional film, Elektra Records

Contributor, Dudley Randall & Margaret G. Burroughs, Editors,

For Malcolm X, Broadside Press

1969-1971

Convicted of Marijuana Possession, Detroit Recorders Court

Prisoner, Marquette Branch Prison, July 1969-September 1970

Daughter: Celia Sanchez Mao Sinclair, born January 17, 1970

Defendant, U.S. District Court, Detroit, Conspiracy to Damage

Government Property: Ann Arbor CIA office

Prisoner, State Prison of Southern Michigan at Jackson, September 1970-December 1971

Author (with Robert Levin), Music & Politics, Jazz & Pop/World Books

Author, “The Alternative Press”, Alternative Press Broadside

Contributing Writer, Creem, Coda, Jazz & Pop, Ann Arbor Sun

Contributor, The Dial-A-Poem Poets, Giorno Poetry Systems LP

Film, Breathing Together: Electric Conspiracy by Morley Markson

Contributor, Clarence Major, Editor, The New Black Poetry

Contributor, Walter Lowenfels, Editor, The Writing On The Wall

1972-1974

Author, Guitar Army: Street Writings/Prison Writings (Douglas/World Books)

Chairman, Rainbow Peoples Party, Ann Arbor

V-P/Creative Director, Rainbow Multi-Media Corporation, Ann Arbor

Artists’ Manager, Mitch Ryder, Detroit, The Rockets, Guardian Angel

Board Member, Amorphia: The Cannabis Cooperative

Film, Ten For Two: The John Sinclair Freedom Rally by Steve Gebhardt

Organizer, Ann Arbor Human Rights Party

Founder & Director, Michigan Committee for Prisoners Rights

Lecturer, Community Control of Prisons, University of Michigan

Producer & Host, Toke Time, WNRZ-FM, Detroit

Talent Coordinator, Ann Arbor Community Parks Program

Founder & Talent Coordinator, People’s Ballroom, Ann Arbor

Founder, Ann Arbor Tribal Council

Coordinator, Michigan Marijuana Initiative

Contributor, Thomas King Forcade, Editor, Underground Press Anthology

Contributor, David Horowitz, Michael P. Lerner & Craig Pyes, Editors,

Counterculture & Revolution, Random House

Contributor, Cynthia Owen Philip, Editor, Imprisoned In America— Prison Communications:1776 To Attica, Harper & Row

Creative Director & Co-Producer, Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festivals

1975-1976

Arts Editor, Editor-In-Chief, Detroit Sun Newspaper

President, Rainbow Productions, Inc., Detroit

Creative Director/Talent Coordinator, Rainbow Room, Shelby Hotel

V-P/Creative Director, Strata Records, Inc., Detroit

Producer & Host, Ancestor Worship, WCBN-FM, Ann Arbor

Change of Name: Omowale John Sinclair, U.S. District Court, Detroit

1977-1979

President, Strata Associates, Inc., Detroit

Executive Director, Allied Artists Association, Detroit

Producer & Host, RE: Visions—Another Look At Modern Music, WCBN-FM

Concert Producer, Orchestra Hall/The Paradise Theatre

Producer/Project Director, Detroit Jazz Artists on Tour

Director, Motor City Blues at the 1973 Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival, Video Documentary

Director, CJQ at the 1973 Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival, Video Documentary

Michigan Director, National Organization for Reform of Marijuana Laws

Expansion Arts Panelist, National Endowment for the Arts

1979-1981

Executive Director, Jazz Research Institute, Detroit

Concert Producer, World Stage & Jazz Gallery, Detroit Jazz Center

Talent Coordinator, Cobb’s Corner Bar, Club Con Brio, Concerts by the River

Producer & Host, The Sound of Detroit, WCBN-FM

Contributor, Glen Mannisto, Dennis Teichman & Jim Wanless, Editors,

48222: A Detroit Book of Poetry, Detroit River Press

1982-1987

Artists’ Manager, The Urbations, Celluloid Records

Concert Producer, St. Andrews Hall, Detroit

Booking Agent/Talent Coordinator, M/S/A, Detroit

Talent Coordinator, B’Stilla, Red Carpet, Kicks (Detroit), Mr. Christians

(Royal Oak), Sully’s (Dearborn), Blue Frogge (Ann Arbor)

Contributing Writer, Detroit Metro Times, Detroit News,

Detroit Free Press

Poet/Performer, John Sinclair & His Blues Scholars

Author, thelonious: a book of monk—volume one (privately published)

Author, “rhythm-a-ning”, Maximus & Company Broadside

Author, “I Can’t Be Satisfied”, Alternative Press Broadside

Lawrence Goldstein, Editor, Detroit: An American City,

University of Michigan Quarterly Review)

1988-1991

Author, We Just Change The Beat: Selected Poems, Ridgway Press

Cassette, We Just Change The Beat with the Blues Scholars, M/S/A

Poetry Series Producer (with Bob Rudnick), Union Street, Detroit

Editor, City Arts Quarterly, Detroit Council of the Arts

Director, City Arts Gallery, Detroit Council of the Arts

Adjunct Professor of Music History, Wayne State University,

History of Rock & Roll, Blues History

Producer & Host, Blue Sensations, WDET-FM, Detroit, MI

Poet/Performer, John Sinclair & His Blues Scholars

Contribuutor, Wavelength, OffBeat, New Orleans

Divorced from Magdalene (Leni) Sinclair, 1988

Married Patricia Brown, January 1, 1989

Contributor, Sherry Hendrick, Editor, Detroit 1989 (privately printed)

Author, “fly right”—a monk suite (privately printed)

Contributor, Ron Allen & Stella Crews, Editors, HIPology, Broadside Press

Contributor, Sascha Feinstein & Yusef Komunyakaa, Editors,

The Jazz Poetry Anthology, Indiana University Press

Contributor, Playboy’s History of Jazz & Rock

Film, Growing Up In America by Morley Markson

Recording, fly right—a monk suite with Ed Moss (unissued)

1991-2003

Creative Director/Producer, Big Chief Productions, New Orleans, LA

Poet/Performer, John Sinclair & His Blues Scholars

Senior Producer, WWOZ-FM, New Orleans

Producer & Host, Blues & Roots and The New Orleans Music Show, WWOZ-FM

Producer & Host, New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival “Live” Broadcast, WWOZ-FM

Writer & Music Programmer, “Crescent City Sounds,” WGBH Radio

Writer & Producer, “Mardi Gras Special with Dr. John,” WWOZ-FM

Writer & Producer, “The Sounds of New Orleans,” WWOZ-FM

Silver Reel Award, National Federation of Community Broadcasters,

Mardi Gras Indian Music Special, WWOZ-FM

Board Member & Historian, Professor Longhair Foundation

Cassette, Beyond Humidity, Mesechabe magazine compilation

Contributor, David Meltzer, Editor, Reading Jazz

Contributor, P-Funk Guitar Army (produced by George Clinton),

Blues Interactions Records compilation

Contributor, Smokin’! The Sounds of New Orleans, Volume 2

with Marion Brown, WWOZ compilation

Co-producer (with Jerry Brock), Piano Night at Tipitina’s

Producer, Piano Night at Tipitina’s , Volumes 1 & 2 I, Overture Records

Feature Writer & Columnist, OffBeat Magazine, New Orleans

Contributing Writer, New Orleans Times-Picayune, Gambit Weekly

Mesechabe. Boston Phoenix, Living Blues, High Times, AllMusic

Guide, Addicted To Noise, Signal To Noise, Perfect Sound Forever,

Arthur, Big City Blues, Addicted To Noise, Heartland Journal,

Woodstock Times, Hour Detroit Producer, Alabama Jubilee Broadcast, WVAS-FM, Montgomery AL

CD, Full Moon Night with the Blues Scholars, Total Energy/Alive Records

10” LP, Friday the 13th with Wayne Kramer (Alive Records

CD, thelonious: a book of monk—volume one (New Alliance Records

CD, If I Could Be With You with Ed Moss & the Society Jazz Orchestra (Schoolkids Records

CD, Full Circle with Wayne Kramer & the Blues Scholars, Alive Records

Producer, WWOZ on CD: The Sounds of New Orleans, Volume 1

Producer, WWOZ on CD: The Sounds of New Orleans, Volume 2

Producer, WWOZ on CD: The Sounds of New Orleans, Volume 3

Producer, Alabama Jubilee—Music from the Jubilee CityFest, WVAS Radio

Producer, MC-5, Power Trip, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, MC-5, Ice Pick Slim, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, MC-5, Teen Age Lust, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, MC-5, Starship, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, MC-5, American Ruse, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, MC-5, Human Being Lawnmower, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, MC-5, Looking At You, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, The Up, Killer Up, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, The Rationals, Temptation’s ‘Bout To Get Me, Total Energy/ Alive Records

Producer, Mitch Ryder & Detroit, Get Out The Vote, Total Energy/ Alive Records

Producer, Little Sonny, Blues With A Feeling, Schoolkids Records

Producer, Please Mr. Foreman: Motor City Blues, Schoolkids Records

Producer, Roosevelt Sykes/Victoria Spivey, Grind It!, Schoolkids Records

Producer, Big Walter Horton/Original King Biscuit Boys, Well All Right!, Schoolkids Records

Producer, Sun Ra & His Arkestra, Life Is Splendid, Total Energy/ Alive Records

Producer, Sun Ra & His Arkestra, Outer Space Employment Agency, Total Energy Records/Alive Records

Producer, Sun Ra & Arkestra, It Is Forbidden, Total Energy/Alive Records

Producer, Ann Arbor Boogie, Blues Interactions Records compilation

Producer, Deacon John, Live at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage

Festival 1994, RedBone Records

Liner notes for BlackTop Records, EMI, CBS/Legacy, Rounder Records,

Orleans Records, Sound of New Orleans Records, Alive Records,

Schoolkids Records, Overture Records and others

Author, Full Circle, minimal press

Film, Slam! by Mark Levin & Richard Stratton

Contributor, Urban Roots, Cutting Edge Compilation CD

Contributor, Motor City’s Burning, Alive Records Compilation CD

Contributor, Jas Mathus & the Knockdown Society, Songs For Rosetta

Contributor, Jazz: The Language of New Orleans, Volume 1,

Louisiana Red Hot Records Compilation CD

Contributor, What It Sounds Like, Mesechabe Cassette Compilation

High Priest, Cannabis Cup 1998. Amsterdam

Composer-Performer, Viper Madness Suite with the Blues Scholars

featuring James Andrews, Milkweg, Amsterdam

European Tour: Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Den Haag, Utrecht, Basel, Berlin

Panelist/Performer, I Rip You You Rip Me, Rotterdam Museum of Art

CD, It’s All Good with Fluxedo Junction, Fluxedo Records

Film, High Times Cannabis Cup 1998 by Steven Hager

Poet/Performer, Collaborations with Walter “Wolfman” Washington, Johnny Vidacovich, Earl Turbinton, James Andrews, Kidd Jordan, Carlo Ditta, Rockin’ Jake, Coco Robicheaux, Andre Wiliams, New Orleans Juice, North Mississippi All Stars, Archie Shepp, Ed Sanders, Bala Tounkare, David Amram, Wayne Kramer, Charles Moore, Daniel Carter, Dee Pop, Calvin Weston, Elliott Levin, Ed Moss & the Society Jazz Orchestra, Jimmie Lee Robinson, James Montgomery, Devil Gods, T.J. Wheeler & The Smokers, Johnnie Bassett & the Blues Insurgents, Bennie Smith, Steve Mackay, Black Mike Henderson, Howling Diablos, Jeff “Baby” Grand, Mick Vranich, Mark Ritsema, Michael Ray & the Cosmic Krewe, Marion Brown, Corey Harris, Eluard Burt, Tim Green, Kermit Ruffins, Willie King, James McCarty, Phil Hale, Thornetta Davis, Lyman Woodard, Harmonica Shah, Kudzu Kings, Afrosippi and others

CD, Steady Rollin’ Man with the Boston Blues Scholars, TriPup Records

CD, Underground Issues, SpyBoy Records

CD, White Buffalo Prayer with the Blues Scholars featuring Wayne

Kramer, SpyBoy Records

Managing Editor, Blues Access Magazine

Best of the Beat Award, “Best Radio Personality,” OffBeat, 1998-1999-

2000-2001-2002-2003

Instructor, “Poetry of the Blues,” Common Ground on the Hill, McDaniel College, Westminster MD

Instructor, “Poetry of the Blues,” New Orleans School of the Imagination

Writer & Producer, Roots Music Gathering, Music Business Institute

Contributor, Bill Milkowski, Rockers, Jazzbos & Visionaries

Contributor, Kudzu Kings, Y 2 Cow CD

Contributor, Cruisin’ Songs from the Motor City with the Blues Scholars,

Harmonie Park Records CD Compilation

Contributor, Welcome to Little Milton, Malaco Records CD

Contributor, Music Is Revolution, The End Is Here CD Compilation

Featured Speaker, White Buffalo Day (St. John Coltrane Church, San

Francisco), MassCann Freedom Rally (Boston Common),

WHEE—World Hemp Expo Extravaganja, (Eugene OR),

Martin Luther King 2000 Symposium (University of Michigan),

Hash Bash (Ann Arbor), Phil Ochs Memorial (Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Cleveland), Human Rights Festival (Athens GA), SXSW (Austin TX), Tennessee Williams Festival (Le Petite Theatre, New Orleans), Bluesstock (Memphis)

Festival appearances, MassCann (Boston), Sunflower Blues Festival

(Clarksdale, MS), North Beach Jazz Festival (San Francisco),

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, Kansas City Blues & Jazz

Festival, Baton Rouge Blues Festival, Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz

Festival, Crossing Borders Festival (Amsterdam), Cannabis Cup

(Amsterdam), Music of the World Festival (Basel), Lowell Celebrates Kerouac (Lowell MA), Berkshire Mountain Music Festival, RiverFest

(Manchester NH), Portsmouth Blues Festival, American Music

Festival (Westminster MD), Greektown Festival (Detroit),

Rainbow Farm Hemp Festival (Niles MI), Chicago Blues Festival,

Toledo Blues Festival, Bumbershoot Festival (Seattle), Washington

Square Park Jazz Festival (San Francisco), Detroit International Jazz

Festival, White Buffalo Day (New Orleans), Bluestock (Memphis),

Heatstock (North Branch MI), Human Rights Festival (Athens GA),

Insomniac-A-Thon (Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans),

Double Decker Festival (Oxford MS)

Film, Happy Here & Now by Michael Almagordo

Member, Screen Actors Guild

Film, Zombie vs. Mardi Gras by Karl DeMolay, Will Frank & Mike Lyddon

Contributor, Legs McNeil & Gillian McCain, Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk

Contributor, BluesHound Guide to the Blues

Author, PeyoteMind, The End Is Here Press

CD, PeyoteMind with Mystery Island, The End Is Here Records

Author, Fattening Frogs For Snakes: Delta Sound Suite, Surregional Press

CD, Fattening Frogs For Snakes, Volume 1: The Delta Sound with the Blues Scholars, Okra-Tone/Rooster Blues Records

Artist in Residence, Wesleyan University, University of Illinois

Contributor. The Brakemen CD

Contributor Live on Frenchmen Street CD with the New Orleans Jazz Vipers

Film, Funky New Orleans by Jean-Francois Bizot

Author, “the Screamers” New Orleans School of the Imagination Broadside, Author, “rhythm-a-ning,” Surregional Press Broadside

CD, KnockOut with Langfrans & Baas B, D-Men Records

Film, MC5: A True Testimonial by David Thomas & Laurel Legler

2003-2008

Poet in Residence, 420 Café, Amsterdam

Producer & Host, The John Sinclair Radio Show, Amsterdam

Founder & Program Director, RadioFreeAmsterdam.com

Columnist, “On The Road,” Little Rock Free Press

Contributor, Encyclopedia of the Blues

Columnist, “Blues & Roots,” [An] Honest Tune

Poet in Residence, The Dolphins coffeeshop, Amsterdam

CD, No Money Down: Greatest Hits, Volume 1, Big Chief Records

Film, U.S. vs. John Lennon by David Leaf & John Scheinfeld

Film, Punk/attitude by Don Letts

Author, “i mean you”—a book for penny, palOmine press

MC/Performer, Davison Blues Festival, Davison MI

Poet/Performer, Detroit International Jazz Festival with the Blues Scholars

Poet/Performer, ArthurFest, Los Angeles

Poet/Performer, HempFest, Seattle

Poet/Performer, Vurige Tongen @ Ruigoord, Amsterdam

Poet/Performer, Beat Hippie Autonomie Punk Exhibit, Cox 18, Milan, Italy

Author, Va Tutto Bene (en Italiano), Stampa Alternativa

CD, criss cross with Mark Ritsema, Big Chief Records

Poet/Performer, Radio Onda Rossa, Roma

Poet/Performer, Libri, Pitigliano, Italy

Poet/Performer, Teatro del Fuoco, Foggia, Italy

Award, Targa Matteo Salvatore, Foggia, Italy

Guest MC, MC5 & Stooges, All Tomorrow’s Parties, UK

Guest Poet, DKT/MC5, Paradiso, Amsterdam

Guest Poet, Black Crowes, Paradiso, Amsterdam

Poet/Performer, Forte Prenestino, Roma

Poet/Performer, Museo Arte di Paolo Pini, Milano

Poet/Performer, Festival della Letteratura Resistente, Elmo, Italy

Author, Guitar Army (en Italiano), Stampa Alternativa

Author, Guitar Army—Street Writings/Prison Writings (2nd Edition with CD), Process Books/Feral House Press

Guest, Cannabis Film Festival, Santiago, Chile

Film, Sun Ra: Brother from Another Planet by Don Letts

Film, Charles Olson: Polis Is This by Henry Ferrini

Writer & Co-Producer, 20 To Life: The Life & Times of John Sinclair, a film by Steve Gebhardt

2008-2012

Poet In Residence, Bohemian National Home, Detroit

Author, It’s All Good—A John Sinclair Reader (with CD), Headpress Books

Poet/Performer, Detroit Life with the Motor City Blues Scholars, No Cover Records

Poet/Performer, Tokyo Hipster Club, Tokyo, Japan; Obama Inauguration Celebration, Café Oto, London with the Londin Blues Scholars; CosmoPoetica, Cordoba, Spain with Mark Ritsema; CosmoPoetica, Murcia, Spain with Mark Ritsema; Jazz & Poetry, Lincoln Center, New York City with Sonny Fortune; Festival Rochefort-en-Accords, France; Hempstock, Portland OR; Lowell Celebrates Kerouac, Lowell MA

Guest, Raindance Film Festival HQ, London

Producer/Host, Sinclair On The Air, Salto Wereld FM, Amsterdam

Producer/Host, Radio Free Genoa, Piazza del Erbe, Genoa

Panelist, Kunstraum Kreuzberg, Berlin

Poet/Performer, Tearing Down The Shrine Of Truth & Beauty with the Pinkeye Orchestra, LocoGnosis Records

Poet/Performer, Viper Madness with the Planet D Nonet, MoSound Records

Speaker, UMass 420 Festival, Amherst MA

Speaker, Medical Cannabis Cup, Seattle

Editor, Sun Ra Interviews & Essays, Headpress

Poet/Performer, Collaborations with Howard Glazer, Guelel Kuumba, Eric Deaton, Lightning Malcolm, Jim Dickinson, David Kimbrough, Kenny Kimbrough, Cedric Burnside, Gilles Riberolles, Tom Worrell, Adventures in Bluesland, Ras Moshe, Jah-Rom Parker Wells, Burton Greene, Marshall Allen, Elliott Levin, Sonny Fortune, Rashied Ali, Reginald Workman, and others

Poet In Residence, Café The Zen, Amsterdam

Poet/Performer, Let’s Go Get ’Em with the Blues Scholars, MoSound Records

Author, Song Of Praise: Homage To John Coltrane (Trembling Pillow Press)

Poet/Performer, Song Of Praise: Homage To John Coltrane (Trembling Pillow Press

Poet/Panelist, Clinton Memorial Library, Little Rock, AR with David Kimbrough

Poet/Performer, Honoring The Local Gods with Hollow Bones, Straw2Gold Records

Poet/Performer, Beatnik Youth with the Beatnik Youth Orchestra, Track Records

Breathing Air Tour with Howard Marks—Ireland-Scotland-England

Guest Poet, DKT/MC5 & Primal Scream, Royal Festival Hall, London

Poet in Residence, Frenchy Gallery, New Orleans

2013-2016

Poet/Performer, Detroit Artists Workshop 50th Anniversary Concert, Scarab Club,

Detroit with the Blues Scholars; An Evening with John Sinclair, University of Michigan—Flint College; Barclays Center, Brooklyn with Rodriquez; Lowell Celebrates Kerouac, Lowell MA with David Amram; Neal Cassidy Birthday Party, Denver with Tom Worrell; Sun Ra 100 Concert, Royal Festival Hall, London with Founder Effect; Double Decker Festival, Oxford MS with Eric Deaton; Hempstalk Festival, Portland OR; Mike Kelley’s Mobile Homestead Opening, MOCAD, Detroit; Viper Madness, Akhnaton, Amsterdam; Freeing John Sinclair, The Ark, Ann Arbor with Wayne Kramer & the Blues Scholars; Maine Harvest Ball, Starks, ME with Portland Art Quartet; Canary Wharf Festival, London with Founder Effect; Detroit Boom Boom Exhibit, Lille, France

Poet In Residence, New Orleans Institute for the Imagination

CD, Mohawk with Steve The Fly, Iron Man Records

Author, It’s All Good—A John Sinclair Reader, Horner Press

Poet/Performer, It’s All Good—A John Sinclair Reader, CD-Baby Album

Poet/Performer, Keeping The Blues Alive with Adventures in Bluesland, Worldwide Vibe Records

Poet/Performer, Viperism, CD-Baby Album

Poet/Performer, Conspiracy Theory, CD-Baby Album

Poet/Performer Fattening Frogs For Snakes (Volumes 1-2-3-4), CD-Baby

Panelist, Detroit Artists Workshop Exhibit, Horse Hospital, London

2017

Poet/Performer,Vinyl LP Mobile Homeland, Jett Plastic Recordings, Funky D Records

Poet/Performer, Vinyl LP Beatnik Youth Ambient Iron Man Records

2018

Poet/Performer, CD Beatnik Youth, Iron Man Records

—Assembled by John Sinclair @ Bristol UK, May 16-18, 2016 and amended by Iron Man Records Feb 2018

You can order JOHN SINCLAIR CDs, Vinyl, Books and T-shirts here

http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth (Double CD) 2018

February 4, 2018

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth” on Double CD
Released 2018 by Iron Man Records.

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham

Catalogue Number: IMB6032

Release date: 2018

Label: Iron Man Records

Distribution: Cargo

Disc 1

  1. Testify (9.10)
  2. Good Stuff (4.32)
  3. Everybody Needs Somebody (7.09)
  4. Change My Life (5.14)
  5. Ain’t Nobody’s Business (3.36)
  6. My Buddy (5.13)
  7. That Old Man (3.53)

Disc 2

  1. Brilliant Corners (11.29)
  2. Culture Cide (11.38)
  3. Red Dress (Ruby My Dear) (6.25)
  4. Sitarrtha (6.16)
  5. Do It (6.16)
  6. War On Drugs (6.18)

Read a brilliant review of Beatnik Youth by Gus Ironside for Louder Than War here

Saby Reyes-Kulkarni interviewed John Sinclair and Youth and wrote a fantastic piece for Bandcamp here

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth CD booklets and cds

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary releases “Beatnik Youth” on Iron Man Records. The double CD contains over 80 minutes of music from the restless creative mind of Youth, with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

You can order the Double CD, Vinyl and T-shirt here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth CD reverse of booklets

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John’s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his ‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zig-zag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Youth

Youth has been responsible for numerous hits from artists including The Verve, Embrace, Echo and the Bunnymen, Crowded House, The Orb, Sir Paul McCartney and The Charlatans. Among his recent projects was the co-production of Pink Floyd‘s final and largely instrumental album, The Endless River. Youth also remixed David Gilmour‘s current solo album, Rattle That Lock. The Verve’s Urban Hymns brought Youth a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year after three consecutive years of nomination.

Youth says “I’m very proud of the longevity of work on Killing Joke and The Orb, how those recordings still sound fresh… and what I’ve done with The Verve and Richard Ashcroft, and Paul McCartney (The Fireman) and Pink Floyd. It’s only really working with those guys, with my insecurities, that I felt as though I could go, ‘yeah, I am a producer’.” His “university” was Killing Joke after he left school, and it “doesn’t really get more intense than that”.

As a young musician Youth, whose real name is Martin Glover, cut his teeth doing bass sessions for Adrian Sherwood productions and for artists such as Kate Bush whose phenomenally successful Hounds of Love album had Youth on bass. He was also a founder member and bassist of the band Killing Joke. After leaving Killing Joke (and a short experiment with the band Brilliant, managed by Bill Drummond and featuring June Montana, Jimmy Cauty and other key innovators of electronic and indie dance music), Youth began working with Alex Paterson and Cauty as The Orb, a collaboration that was responsible for the introduction of chill-out ambient house music.

Cauty and Drummond eventually moved on to form The KLF, leaving Youth and Paterson to experiment extensively in the post punk British dance music and Acid House scene. This led to the release of two classic albums as The Orb – U.F.Orb and Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, which incorporated Little Fluffy Clouds, a track that defined ambient house and chill-out and brought these genres firmly into the mainstream.

Youth’s skills as a producer were now being noticed by a much wider audience, not least because of his remix work with band like Siouxsie and The Banshees, Malcolm Maclaren, A Guy Called Gerald, Fine Young Cannibals, Marc Almond and U2. In 1993, he collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney who had developed an interest in remix culture. This resulted in Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, an ambient album – and the first of three critically acclaimed albums – released under the name of The Fireman.

Over the years, Youth has notched up a staggeringly large and varied list of production and remix credits for artists such as Yazz, James, Primal Scream, Gun’s N’ Roses, Blue Pearl, Art of Noise, P.M. Dawn, Shack, De La Soul, Erasure, Beth Orton, Bananarama, Maria McKee, Suns of Arqa, The Shamen, Kool and the Gang, Texas, Pete Murphy, Tom Jones and Dido. He remains tireless in his quest for inspiration, excellence and innovation in recording great music and also finds time to paint, illustrate and publish poetry.

John Sinclair

John Sinclair the White Panther firebrand who stoked the MC5’s insurrectionary manifesto has roots that stretch back to jazz and the beats, as a writer, avant-garde champion and poet. John has travelled the world, collaborating with like-minded souls; a living embodiment of the original free spirit that fought to emancipate a generation, one of the few still flying the freak flag.

Since the early 90s, Sinclair has released albums of his poetry, but Beatnik Youth is possibly some of John Sinclair’s best work to date.

This poorly served generation needs it: that militant energy which released the bats in the 60s is crucially booted into the 21st Century in a riotous celebration of personal freedom, cultural trailblazers and marijuana.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth CD display

The following Iron Man Records Patrons have made this release possible:

Suzy Tweddle, Deborah Ritchie, Scott Roe, Margaret Calleja, Thomas Rathgeber, Dan, Lee Parsfield, Chris Scales, Muir Mathewson, Michael Howe, Jonathan Harris, Dave Barnard, Bill Fadden, Mike Burgess, Jachim Palm, Lyle Bignon, Thomas Burke, Ben Cartlidge, Matt Grimes, Toby Conyers, Chris, Andy Cavendish, Steve Wyatt, Andrew Dubber, Frank Knoblich, Vaughan Roberts, Ian Robertson, Marcus H, Seth Faergolzia, Ricky Lee, Kathryn McCormack, Ade Cartwright, Sunwoo Jung, Chris Crass, Elie Brysbaert, Jonathon Watkiss, Dave Santorum-Crespo, Patrick Domka, Gaz Dennis, Larry Farber, Robert Cotter, Michelle Omoboni, Bob Antonini…..

Become a Patron too https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth – Double CD – review by Steve Fly Amsterdam, 2017

December 13, 2017

The story of the Beatnik Youth album begins in London. John Sinclair was visiting to perform with guitarist Al Clayton and his band The Dirty Strangers, Gigs organised in part by Ian Grant, including a double bill with Zodiac / Youth. Martin ‘Youth’ Glover came into John’s orbit and found a kindred spirit in John, proposing they work on a jazz project together. 

Sure enough plans were laid out for John to travel to Kingston College Of Music in London, to a recording session set up by Youth. The list of musicians in the large room was staggering: George Butler, Hugo Wilkinson and Steven Pratt on drums, Al Clayton and Brian James and James Sedwards on guitars, Youth on bass, Angie Brown and Mark Stewart on vocals, Alex Ward on saxophones and piano, Michael Rendall on organ plus recording duties. The energy in the room was huge.

John’s words switched from a whisper to a roar, screaming against the wall of guitars for his old gang, and then undressing the piano with a hushed prayer to Thelonious Monk. The musicians tracked all afternoon and managed to subtly fuse straight ahead rock & roll with a jazz sensibility, and a tonal blanket of sound that exploited all the instrumentalists and vocalists at the session.

Over the next 12 months, Youth, John and Michael Rendall edited, shaped and overdubbed new parts to create Beatnik Youth V. 1.0. New editions included such UK heads as Bobby Gillespie and Howard Marks R.I.P who added the perfect authentic taste to an underground classic. The late great Mick Farren penned some delightful liner notes, and Ian Grant of track records, quickly produced a small run of 300 copies on compact disk. Due to unforeseen obstacles, Beatnik Youth 1.0 was never properly released, and so sat as an unreleased album project, poems and sound in purgatory.

Enter Mark at Iron Man Records. After unprecedented support from Mark in preparing and releasing the album Mohawk by John Sinclair in 2014, he expressed interest in reviving the Beatnik Youth project from its zombie state. Three years later, in 2017, we can thank Mark, and Ian, and Youth and John for combined efforts to give the album a proper release and promotional campaign worthy of the material. Thanks are also due to Sean Newsham at Mutante for his excellent work on press, and to all the reviewers and writers who picked up on this sleeping giant.

In the space of three years this team of volunteers for the most part, led by Youth and Mark, created a separate mini-EP titled Beatnik Youth Ambient that featured two ambient remixes of tracks from the original session, plus two new works with material from Howard Marks and a new piece called ‘Do It’ by John. The album was mastered and pressed to 12” vinyl. Youth stayed up all night and drew the artwork himself depicting John among a whirlwind of illustrated 1960s psychedelic symbolism. Beatnik Youth Ambient was released July 28th, 2017. Pick up a slice of this historic wax and let it spin, you’ll be lifted I guarantee.

Beatnik Youth V. 2.0 is the new album, a deluxe double CD with re-mastered and re-edited tracks including the new recordings from Beatnik Youth Ambient resulting in 90 minutes of music. The album has been lovingly designed and constructed by Russ Clarke. If anyone is familiar with a Jack Kerouac 1st edition, or the events that unfolded in Detroit in July 1967 you may find this album interesting. The double CD with unlimited streaming and download is available now via BandCamp and will also be available from Cargo (see end notes).

And finally, to the music: “Testify,” opening like the doors to a Persian hash lounge, with piano and guitars and singers swaying to the breeze of the bard’s voice. The tale begins, the great world outlook of John Sinclair is accompanied by a chorus of cherubs repeating the word ‘testify.’ The poet returns with “friday the 13th,” a lament to Thelonious Monk and John Lennon, the tragedy spilling onto the keys, Alex Ward hammering and the guitar feedback building, the poem zooming to a grand concrescence of heart and head, leaving the listener engrossed. Drums dart in and out, the 2nd poem ends with a statement of intent for there to be more men like Monk and John Lennon, and that we should be able die when it’s time for us to die, not by some punk with a weapon. The drums return and the bard delivers “Fat Boy,” guitar feedback buzzing under another blistering poem critical of the American love affair with bombs and destruction, and the atrocity of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Good Stuff. Classic British rock & roll, driven sideways by George Butler on drums and vamped up and out by a chorus of guitarists, the poet reads and bleeds for his friends, his music and loves, his poetry and beatnik lifestyle. The title of the poem ‘the screamers’ opens with ‘the screamers, stagger down overgrown sidewalks, of memory…” and goes on to juxtapose lyrics from Bo Diddley, paying homage to Chuck Berry and Jimmy Reed, the foundations of modern Rock & Roll.

“Everybody Needs Somebody” returns with another locked rock beat boosted by the chorus of voices singing ‘Everybody Needs Somebody’ and a swell of organ keeping the tension. The poet dives into “monk in orbit,” a most delightful historical tale of Allen Ginsberg turning on Thelonious Monk to LSD, setting John in his element of Bebop and Beatnik legends colliding in history by way of a technicolored gyroscopic portal of poetry. Featuring Andrew Robinson on synth dotting some buzzed phrases and electric kool-aid to the brew. The bard returns with his own anecdote and ode to Allen Ginsberg, reaffirming the trio of Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as the beats who started it all.

“Change My Life” opens with another straight-ahead beat and the return of Angie Brown and the vocals searing underneath the bard, describing how and why early blues musicians would modify the beat, the tempo, and so change the whole feel of the song. Changing beats. Al Clayton, James Sedwards and Jesse Wood exchange riffs, as Mr. Pratt drags the beat through an indie pop swamp. An upbeat beat poem about changing beats.

“Ain’t Nobody’s Business.” Testament to the genius of Youth and how he can rearrange and compose music for poems, turning them into totally new beasts, bringing back the chorus of voices, guitars and stomping drums at all the right places. Short and sweet, wrapping up John’s testament to an individualist anarchist perspective—our right to our own bad habits, a provocative role call of examples.

“My Buddy,” the poet’s tribute to Henry Normile, describing the tragic murder in Detroit of his best friend, made brighter in verse by describing Marcus Belgrave, his upturned horn, and the snowflakes falling inside as Belgrave played for Henry’s funeral procession. Recalling Henry’s last wishes that dance off the tongue like acrobatic spit balls ‘Cocaine, Pussy and Lobster, in that order.’ The weight and depth of a friendship forged in Detroit, a litany, epitaph, the poet’s Buddy, Henry Normile. “A….fucking…men” James Sedwards takes a tight solo around the Zodiac, Angie Brown kicks into another dimension of harmony, soul in the spirit of Badu, the music closes the poem with a well pitched instrumental epilogue.

“That Old Man” oozes the bass beauty of Youth, soothing organ of Michael and the gentle crooning of Angie Brown, who breaks into a captivating vocal solo demonstrating her range and soul power. The drums sound like the work of Fly. The poet serves up feedback from the long winding roads and mystery of love and relations. In his gentle and authoritative tone, the poet opens with a line from fellow poet Robert Lowell, “living without you is like learning to walk.” The poem goes on to question the distance between ex-lovers, counting the blessings of family, friends, and co-conspirators, “that old man, / still alive and kicking / with both feet” Yeah yer’ right.

“Brilliant Corners.” Jettisons off into a bed of ambient jelly, as if John’s voice were slowed down 1000 times, the work of Youth and Michael Rendall exploring the interspace of the poetry, like electronic seagulls, and thunder far off in the distance, the tide of a new Blade Runner washing over the synths. The poet delivers a long poem detailing the trajectory of the beats, now familiar names from these poems, Ginsberg, Kerouac, Burroughs. Introducing each revolutionary writer with biographical and bibliographic precision. The deep knowing and passion for each and every character, now bringing the be-bop all stars off the page and into the music. Ambient angels the size of cruise ships howling just beneath the storm clouds, sunlight occasionally breaking through, shrieking upon the faces of the genius under observation. Pistons hiss, and synthesizers gurgle as the poet fills in the points on a road map to his life’s journey. The track is brought to a close with an epilogue by Mark Stewart.

“Culture-cide.” An upbeat Brit funk protest anthem, programmed by Primal Scream and featuring guitar by Keith Levine, with a chorus hook sung by the Scottish band The View, and a part sung by Bobby Gillespie, the song chugs along with some big hats and menacing synthesiser garnishing. More vocals appear courtesy of Robb Spragg, of Alabama 3, adding to the gang. The poet brings the latest feedback from the frontline of the war on some drugs in America, his poem “It’s All Good” presents some hope by paying full respects to all the growers and suppliers of cannabis in Amsterdam, at the Cannabis Cup, and all around the world. Just when you thought it was over, a familiar Welsh voice starts up, it’s Howard Marks, on an hilarious philosophical journey through some reasoning about the war on drugs. Howard explodes into a surrealist rollercoaster of observations and uncensored provocation.

“Red Dress” (“Ruby My Dear”). A softly spoken jazz delight, once again visiting the music of Thelonious Monk, here talking romance of the woman in the red dress. Alex Ward on keys, with big Al Clayton and James Sedwards cooing from the tree tops, a pair of guitar cats playing under moonlight. Angie Brown swoops down to deliver the soul from above, high up there in the sensual regions of soul. “The music is soft and sweet and deep with intelligence.” I, Fly, lay down some sweet brush strokes, and the band drift across the sleeping city moments before dawn.

“Sitarrtha.” Back in the great temple of music we started in, saxophones squeal and rise in the distance, percussion swirling like a desert dust devil. “What is jazz?” The bard asks, and then goes on to present alternative scenarios as to the what. “What is blues” and a similar answer.  I, fly, on drums with dampened sticks stroking the toms, breaking the beats. And the poem builds and charges up, bootstrapping from each previous statement, into the meat and the marrow of the listener. The saxophones reaching higher, the drums and percussion speed up, voices and saxophones shriek at each other. The bard walks straight into a pole, such is the force of the music. First hand experience of contact with John Coltrane, left in a John Coltrance. Leaving us with a choice to become as real as they are, those legendary musicians. The song and the poem demonstrate tension, build up and release respectively.

“Do It.” An ambient techno track produced by Youth and representative of his excursions into techno and electronica. John shares more advice on making it as an artist, retelling his experiences and then giving us the best advice he can, the only advice you can give: “Do It.” You have to make it through your actions, you have to get up and do these things which artists dream up, that is the perfect sentiment to summarize this album and the efforts to present it, for you, dear listener. Together with the time and money and logistics, it’s the willingness to do it, that made this all happen. Do it. Do it. Do it.

Beatnik Youth approaches a Magnum Opus in its reach, quality and totality. Here is the music and wefted into it, the history, a one-stop shop for first-hand feedback from the fabled 1960 cultural revolution, from John Sinclair, who Mick Farren so aptly called ‘The Last Of The Beatnik Warrior Poets.’ This album bridges British and American culture, outside of the mainstream channels, producing a lasting testament to our rebellious ancestors and innovators of hip.

—Steven Pratt
Amsterdam, 2017

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth” on Double CD released 2017 by Iron Man Records.

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

Catalogue Number: IMB6032

Label: Iron Man Records

Distribution: Cargo

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Double CD, Download, Stream via Bandcamp

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Double CD via Big Cartel

Cargo Records Direct

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth (Double CD) 2017

September 15, 2017

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth” on Double CD
Released 2017 by Iron Man Records.

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

Catalogue Number: IMB6032

Release date: 2017

Label: Iron Man Records

Distribution: Cargo

Disc 1

  1. Testify (9.10)
  2. Good Stuff (4.32)
  3. Everybody Needs Somebody (7.09)
  4. Change My Life (5.14)
  5. Ain’t Nobody’s Business (3.36)
  6. My Buddy (5.13)
  7. That Old Man (3.53)

Disc 2

  1. Brilliant Corners (11.29)
  2. Culture Cide (11.38)
  3. Red Dress (Ruby My Dear) (6.25)
  4. Sitarrtha (6.16)
  5. Do It (6.16)
  6. War On Drugs (6.18)

Read the brilliant review of Beatnik Youth by Gus Ironside for Louder Than War here

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary releases “Beatnik Youth” on Iron Man Records. The double CD contains over 80 minutes of music from the restless creative mind of Youth, with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

You can order the Double CD, Vinyl and T-shirt here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John’s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his ‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zig-zag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Youth

Youth has been responsible for numerous hits from artists including The Verve, Embrace, Echo and the Bunnymen, Crowded House, The Orb, Sir Paul McCartney and The Charlatans. Among his recent projects was the co-production of Pink Floyd‘s final and largely instrumental album, The Endless River. Youth also remixed David Gilmour‘s current solo album, Rattle That Lock. The Verve’s Urban Hymns brought Youth a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year after three consecutive years of nomination.

Youth says “I’m very proud of the longevity of work on Killing Joke and The Orb, how those recordings still sound fresh… and what I’ve done with The Verve and Richard Ashcroft, and Paul McCartney (The Fireman) and Pink Floyd. It’s only really working with those guys, with my insecurities, that I felt as though I could go, ‘yeah, I am a producer’.” His “university” was Killing Joke after he left school, and it “doesn’t really get more intense than that”.

As a young musician Youth, whose real name is Martin Glover, cut his teeth doing bass sessions for Adrian Sherwood productions and for artists such as Kate Bush whose phenomenally successful Hounds of Love album had Youth on bass. He was also a founder member and bassist of the band Killing Joke. After leaving Killing Joke (and a short experiment with the band Brilliant, managed by Bill Drummond and featuring June Montana, Jimmy Cauty and other key innovators of electronic and indie dance music), Youth began working with Alex Paterson and Cauty as The Orb, a collaboration that was responsible for the introduction of chill-out ambient house music.

Cauty and Drummond eventually moved on to form The KLF, leaving Youth and Paterson to experiment extensively in the post punk British dance music and Acid House scene. This led to the release of two classic albums as The Orb – U.F.Orb and Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, which incorporated Little Fluffy Clouds, a track that defined ambient house and chill-out and brought these genres firmly into the mainstream.

Youth’s skills as a producer were now being noticed by a much wider audience, not least because of his remix work with band like Siouxsie and The Banshees, Malcolm Maclaren, A Guy Called Gerald, Fine Young Cannibals, Marc Almond and U2. In 1993, he collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney who had developed an interest in remix culture. This resulted in Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, an ambient album – and the first of three critically acclaimed albums – released under the name of The Fireman.

Over the years, Youth has notched up a staggeringly large and varied list of production and remix credits for artists such as Yazz, James, Primal Scream, Gun’s N’ Roses, Blue Pearl, Art of Noise, P.M. Dawn, Shack, De La Soul, Erasure, Beth Orton, Bananarama, Maria McKee, Suns of Arqa, The Shamen, Kool and the Gang, Texas, Pete Murphy, Tom Jones and Dido. He remains tireless in his quest for inspiration, excellence and innovation in recording great music and also finds time to paint, illustrate and publish poetry.

John Sinclair

John Sinclair the White Panther firebrand who stoked the MC5’s insurrectionary manifesto has roots that stretch back to jazz and the beats, as a writer, avant-garde champion and poet. John has travelled the world, collaborating with like-minded souls; a living embodiment of the original free spirit that fought to emancipate a generation, one of the few still flying the freak flag.

Since the early 90s, Sinclair has released albums of his poetry, but Beatnik Youth is possibly some of John Sinclair’s best work to date.

This poorly served generation needs it: that militant energy which released the bats in the 60s is crucially booted into the 21st Century in a riotous celebration of personal freedom, cultural trailblazers and marijuana.

The following Iron Man Records Patrons have made this release possible:

Suzy Tweddle, Deborah Ritchie, Scott Roe, Margaret Calleja, Thomas Rathgeber, Dan, Lee Parsfield, Chris Scales, Muir Mathewson, Michael Howe, Jonathan Harris, Dave Barnard, Bill Fadden, Mike Burgess, Jachim Palm, Lyle Bignon, Thomas Burke, Ben Cartlidge, Matt Grimes, Toby Conyers, Chris, Andy Cavendish, Steve Wyatt, Andrew Dubber, Frank Knoblich, Vaughan Roberts, Ian Robertson, Marcus H, Seth Faergolzia, Ricky Lee, Kathryn McCormack, Ade Cartwright, Sunwoo Jung, Chris Crass, Elie Brysbaert, Jonathon Watkiss, Dave Santorum-Crespo, Patrick Domka, Gaz Dennis, Larry Farber…..

Become a Patron too https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient – Press update

July 20, 2017

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth Ambient - Artwork
John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient
Iron Man Records
IMB6033

Distributed by Cargo BUY IT HERE

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

“Incendiary bebop beauty from the renegade poet John Sinclair with hand drawn cover artwork by YOUTH. If we ever needed a passionate beat soul speaking words of wisdom, it’s now, and John Sinclair – Revolutionary, Jazzman – lays it down. Bohemian ex-manager of the MC5, Sinclair was central to 1960’s counterculture. A year or two back he met producer YOUTH (Primal Scream, U2), and got dragged into the 21st Century.

The result is a hypnotic celebration of personal freedom; laid-back thoughts spoken in John Sinclair’s gruff, grainy drawl, draped against blues, bebop and trip-hop.

Do It, with it’s lonesome sax, echoes Paddy McAloon’s intimate I Trawl The Megahertz: “In those days, to make poetry and art…that wasn’t called for. But you did it, even though you knew you would never get paid…”

Brilliant Corners is a wild tribute to Jack Kerouac, and Sitarrtha offers, “If we’re lucky, music will bring us through, and we’ll wake up singing.” What a dude.” – Glyn Brown **** Mojo Magazine August 2017.

Order John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient here

John Sinclair Beatnik Youth Ambient review MOJO Aug 2017
John Sinclair interview MOJO Aug 2017

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth Ambient - UNCUT Magazine September 2017
John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth Ambient - Electronic Sound Magazine - August 2017

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient UK Press/Radio feedback – Released July 28th 2017

BBC6Music – Gideon Coe played ‘Do It’ on last nights show – 8th June.

BBC6Music Jon Hillcock (sitting in for Gideon Coe) played ‘Do It’ on 31st May

BBC6Music – Jon Hillcock (sitting in for Gideon Coe) played ’Sitarratha’ on 30th May.

BBC Radio Lancashire – On The Wire – Steve Barker played ‘Do It’ on 17th June

Shoreditch Radio (London) The RealMusik Radio Show – Peter Coulston played ‘Do It’ on 2 August

Confirmed Features

Bandcamp Magazine feature – Saby Reyes-Kulkarni interviewed John and Youth
Mojo Magazine – Eyewitness feature – Pat Gilbert – for issue out end of June – interview done – out now
Louder than War Magazine feature – skype with Gus Ironside done earlier this week email Q&A with Youth

Confirmed Album Reviews

Electronic Sound Magazine
Louder Than War Magazine – Gus Ironside – out now http://louderthanwar.com/john-sinclair-beatnik-youth-ambient-album-review/
Mojo Magazine – Glyn Brown – out now
Record Collector – Kris Needs
Shindig Magazine – Chris Twomey
Uncut Magazine – John Lewis – out now
Vive Le Rock

Digital Press

Cone Magazine – http://www.conemagazine.com/john-sinclair/
DMC World Ben Hogwood
Monolith Cocktail – http://bit.ly/2uIiQRk
Sunday Experience – https://marklosingtoday.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/john-sinclair-2/
Whisperin & Hollerin – Carl Martin

The Seventh Wave (Birmingham) Chris MacAdams – playing tracks

Iron Man Records Discography Advertisement A5 Landscape without marks

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth (Double CD) 8th September 2017

March 15, 2017

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth” on Double CD
Released 8th September 2017 by Iron Man Records.

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

Catalogue Number: IMB6032

Release date: 8th September 2017

Label: Iron Man Records

Distribution: Cargo

Disc 1

  1. Testify (9.10)
  2. Good Stuff (4.32)
  3. Everybody Needs Somebody (7.09)
  4. Change My Life (5.14)
  5. Ain’t Nobody’s Business (3.36)
  6. My Buddy (5.13)
  7. That Old Man (3.53)

Disc 2

  1. Brilliant Corners (11.29)
  2. Culture Cide (11.38)
  3. Red Dress (Ruby My Dear) (6.25)
  4. Sitarrtha (6.16)
  5. Do It (6.16)
  6. War On Drugs (6.18)

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary releases “Beatnik Youth” on 8th September 2017 on Iron Man Records. The double CD contains over 80 minutes of music from the restless creative mind of Youth, with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

You can pre-order the Double CD, Vinyl and T-shirt here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John’s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his ‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zig-zag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Youth

Youth has been responsible for numerous hits from artists including The Verve, Embrace, Echo and the Bunnymen, Crowded House, The Orb, Sir Paul McCartney and The Charlatans. Among his recent projects was the co-production of Pink Floyd‘s final and largely instrumental album, The Endless River. Youth also remixed David Gilmour‘s current solo album, Rattle That Lock. The Verve’s Urban Hymns brought Youth a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year after three consecutive years of nomination.

Youth says “I’m very proud of the longevity of work on Killing Joke and The Orb, how those recordings still sound fresh… and what I’ve done with The Verve and Richard Ashcroft, and Paul McCartney (The Fireman) and Pink Floyd. It’s only really working with those guys, with my insecurities, that I felt as though I could go, ‘yeah, I am a producer’.” His “university” was Killing Joke after he left school, and it “doesn’t really get more intense than that”.

As a young musician Youth, whose real name is Martin Glover, cut his teeth doing bass sessions for Adrian Sherwood productions and for artists such as Kate Bush whose phenomenally successful Hounds of Love album had Youth on bass. He was also a founder member and bassist of the band Killing Joke. After leaving Killing Joke (and a short experiment with the band Brilliant, managed by Bill Drummond and featuring June Montana, Jimmy Cauty and other key innovators of electronic and indie dance music), Youth began working with Alex Paterson and Cauty as The Orb, a collaboration that was responsible for the introduction of chill-out ambient house music.

Cauty and Drummond eventually moved on to form The KLF, leaving Youth and Paterson to experiment extensively in the post punk British dance music and Acid House scene. This led to the release of two classic albums as The Orb – U.F.Orb and Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, which incorporated Little Fluffy Clouds, a track that defined ambient house and chill-out and brought these genres firmly into the mainstream.

Youth’s skills as a producer were now being noticed by a much wider audience, not least because of his remix work with band like Siouxsie and The Banshees, Malcolm Maclaren, A Guy Called Gerald, Fine Young Cannibals, Marc Almond and U2. In 1993, he collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney who had developed an interest in remix culture. This resulted in Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, an ambient album – and the first of three critically acclaimed albums – released under the name of The Fireman.

Over the years, Youth has notched up a staggeringly large and varied list of production and remix credits for artists such as Yazz, James, Primal Scream, Gun’s N’ Roses, Blue Pearl, Art of Noise, P.M. Dawn, Shack, De La Soul, Erasure, Beth Orton, Bananarama, Maria McKee, Suns of Arqa, The Shamen, Kool and the Gang, Texas, Pete Murphy, Tom Jones and Dido. He remains tireless in his quest for inspiration, excellence and innovation in recording great music and also finds time to paint, illustrate and publish poetry.

John Sinclair

John Sinclair the White Panther firebrand who stoked the MC5’s insurrectionary manifesto has roots that stretch back to jazz and the beats, as a writer, avant-garde champion and poet. John has travelled the world, collaborating with like-minded souls; a living embodiment of the original free spirit that fought to emancipate a generation, one of the few still flying the freak flag.

Since the early 90s, Sinclair has released albums of his poetry, but Beatnik Youth is possibly some of John Sinclair’s best work to date.

This poorly served generation needs it: that militant energy which released the bats in the 60s is crucially booted into the 21st Century in a riotous celebration of personal freedom, cultural trailblazers and marijuana.

The following Iron Man Records Patrons have made this release possible:

Suzy Tweddle, Deborah Ritchie, Scott Roe, Margaret Calleja, Thomas Rathgeber, Dan, Lee Parsfield, Chris Scales, Muir Mathewson, Michael Howe, Jonathan Harris, Dave Barnard, Bill Fadden, Mike Burgess, Jachim Palm, Lyle Bignon, Thomas Burke, Ben Cartlidge, Matt Grimes, Toby Conyers, Chris, Andy Cavendish, Steve Wyatt, Andrew Dubber, Frank Knoblich, Vaughan Roberts, Ian Robertson, Marcus H….

Become a Patron too https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient (500 copies on Vinyl) 28th July 2017

March 15, 2017

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Vinyl.
by Iron Man Records.

Pre-order the Vinyl here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

Catalogue Number: IMB6033

Barcode: 5060132273319

Label: Iron Man Records

Release Date: 28th July 2017

Distribution: Cargo

Side A

Do It (6:16) Recitation – John Sinclair, Music – Youth, Mix – Youth and Michael Rendall

Brilliant Corners (11.29) Recitation – John Sinclair, Produced by Youth

Side B

War On Drugs (6:18) Recitation – Howard Marks, Music – Youth, Mix – Youth and Michael Rendall

Sitarrrtha (9:19) Recitation – John Sinclair, Produced by Youth

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary will release “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Iron Man Records. The record is over 30 minutes of ambient, chill out music from the restless creative mind of Youth with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, this year, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers, Youth has also hand drawn the beautiful cover artwork.

The record features 4 ambient tracks including 2 tracks completed in late 2015. Do it and War on Drugs were composed and produced by Youth with words By John Sinclair and Howard Marks. John Sinclair presents some illuminating words of wisdom on the life of the artist in the opening track Do It, while Howard Marks delivers some lost last words in War on Drugs on side B. The Mood is maintained by 2 extra ambient tracks taken from the Beatnik Youth album simultaneously released by Iron Man Records on Double CD. The free-form cinematic Brilliant Corners is a homage to Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs and the smokily atmospheric Sitarrtha reflects on the work of John Coltrane.

The record is a smoker’s dream with the 4 ambient tracks clocking in at just over 30 minutes.

LP-3.5mmSPINE_GZ.qxd

You can pre-order the Vinyl, Double CD and T-shirt here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his ‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth Ambient is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zigzag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Youth

Youth has been responsible for numerous hits from artists including The Verve, Embrace, Echo and the Bunnymen, Crowded House, The Orb, Sir Paul McCartney and The Charlatans. Among his recent projects was the co-production of Pink Floyd‘s final and largely instrumental album, The Endless River. Youth also remixed David Gilmour‘s current solo album, Rattle That Lock. The Verve’s Urban Hymns brought Youth a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year after three consecutive years of nomination.

Youth says “I’m very proud of the longevity of work on Killing Joke and The Orb, how those recordings still sound fresh… and what I’ve done with The Verve and Richard Ashcroft, and Paul McCartney (The Fireman) and Pink Floyd. It’s only really working with those guys, with my insecurities, that I felt as though I could go, ‘yeah, I am a producer’.” His “university” was Killing Joke after he left school, and it “doesn’t really get more intense than that”.

As a young musician Youth, whose real name is Martin Glover, cut his teeth doing bass sessions for Adrian Sherwood productions and for artists such as Kate Bush whose phenomenally successful Hounds of Love album had Youth on bass. He was also a founder member and bassist of the band Killing Joke. After leaving Killing Joke (and a short experiment with the band Brilliant, managed by Bill Drummond and featuring June Montana, Jimmy Cauty and other key innovators of electronic and indie dance music), Youth began working with Alex Paterson and Cauty as The Orb, a collaboration that was responsible for the introduction of chill-out ambient house music.

Cauty and Drummond eventually moved on to form The KLF, leaving Youth and Paterson to experiment extensively in the post punk British dance music and Acid House scene. This led to the release of two classic albums as The Orb – U.F.Orb and Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, which incorporated Little Fluffy Clouds, a track that defined ambient house and chill-out and brought these genres firmly into the mainstream.

Youth’s skills as a producer were now being noticed by a much wider audience, not least because of his remix work with band like Siouxsie and The Banshees, Malcolm Maclaren, A Guy Called Gerald, Fine Young Cannibals, Marc Almond and U2. In 1993, he collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney who had developed an interest in remix culture. This resulted in Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, an ambient album – and the first of three critically acclaimed albums – released under the name of The Fireman.

Over the years, Youth has notched up a staggeringly large and varied list of production and remix credits for artists such as Yazz, James, Primal Scream, Gun’s N’ Roses, Blue Pearl, Art of Noise, P.M. Dawn, Shack, De La Soul, Erasure, Beth Orton, Bananarama, Maria McKee, Suns of Arqa, The Shamen, Kool and the Gang, Texas, Pete Murphy, Tom Jones and Dido. He remains tireless in his quest for inspiration, excellence and innovation in recording great music and also finds time to paint, illustrate and publish poetry. All original artwork on the sleeve was hand drawn by Youth.

John Sinclair

John Sinclair the White Panther firebrand who stoked the MC5’s insurrectionary manifesto has roots that stretch back to jazz and the beats, as a writer, avant-garde champion and poet. John has travelled the world, collaborating with like-minded souls; a living embodiment of the original free spirit that fought to emancipate a generation, one of the few still flying the freak flag.

Since the early 90s, Sinclair has released albums of his poetry, but Beatnik Youth Ambient is possibly some of John Sinclair’s best work to date.

This poorly served generation needs it: that militant energy which released the bats in the 60s is crucially booted into the 21st Century in a riotous celebration of personal freedom, cultural trailblazers and marijuana.

The following Iron Man Records Patrons have made this Vinyl release possible:

Suzy Tweddle, Deborah Ritchie, Scott Roe, Margaret Calleja, Thomas Rathgeber, Dan, Lee Parsfield, Chris Scales, Muir Mathewson, Michael Howe, Jonathan Harris, Dave Barnard, Bill Fadden, Mike Burgess, Jachim Palm, Lyle Bignon, Thomas Burke, Ben Cartlidge, Matt Grimes, Toby Conyers, Chris, Andy Cavendish, Steve Wyatt, Andrew Dubber, Frank Knoblich, Vaughan Roberts, Ian Robertson, Marcus H, Seth Faergolzia, Ricky Lee, Kathryn McCormack, Ade Cartwright, Sunwoo Jung….

Become a Patron too https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

Iron Man Records would like you to become a Patron.

February 3, 2017

The general history of art and literature shows that the highest achievements of the human mind are, as a rule, not favourably received at first. Iron Man Records would like to invite you to consider becoming a Patron.

Iron Man Records has dedicated over 20 years to supporting, promoting, and working with, some of the most interesting artists you may never have heard of, sometimes with a budget you can stick under a glass.

February will see the release of Police Bastard – “Confined” on Vinyl.

One of CVLT Nation’s Top Crust Albums: “Thought-provoking monologues and confrontational lyrics bring you on a cold, doom-laden journey of perpetual war, psychological mind control and disillusionment.”

April will see the release of John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Vinyl.

Ambient, chill out music from the restless creative mind of Youth with spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation. A psychedelic poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution, John Sinclair’s mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers, Youth has also hand drawn the beautiful cover artwork.

Please consider becoming a Patron to support the work. Incredible amounts of time, effort, and money has gone into making these records happen. Iron Man Records would like to invite you to give your support to the artists involved and their work.

Among the rewards, Patrons will get a copy of each release as soon as it is available and Patrons will get their names printed on the sleeve of all future releases generated with their help and support.

You have to build the world you want to live in, and while you may not want to consider running a record label yourself, you can directly influence what happens next. Patrons enable Iron Man Records to continue the work supporting struggling artists.

Please consider getting involved. If you want an alternative to what you see going on around you, you have to make it for yourself. Let’s make something happen https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

How to live a psychedelic life with the poet and activist John Sinclair

July 26, 2016

John Sinclair at 12 Bar Club, London, Sunday 11th May 2014

Psychedelia with John Sinclair
Stuart Maconie’s Freak Zone

Stuart finds out how to live a psychedelic life with the poet and activist John Sinclair as BBC Music’s My Generation celebrates the 1960s. John Sinclair is best known for his jazz poetry, managing the rock band MC5 and being a founding member of the White Panther party in the late 1960s. Stuart chats to him about the creative philosophies behind psychedlia and how to open your mind.

John Sinclair in the Iron Man Records shop

Free The Weed 65 by John Sinclair

July 21, 2016

Highest greetings from Amsterdam, where I’m enjoying one of the finest summers ever with lots of sunshine and not so much rain. As a Flint native, I’m accustomed to long hot summers with plenty of heat, and as a former resident of New Orleans, I know what heat and humidity are all about.

There’s nothing like that here, and it stays kind of chilly most of the time even after the sunniest days, but it’s great to have more sun than rain in one’s life here in Amsterdam, and I’ll take it!

I had a great experience the other night when I went with my friend Leslie Lopez to the Nord to visit his little recording studio. I used to spend a lot of time with Lopez in the basement of Café the Zen, where his studio used to be, and we made an album together down there several years ago. It’s called Let’s Go Get ’Em if you ever want to hear it, and you can download it at CD-Baby for a modest payment.

Speaking of payment, the economics of marijuana consumption has been a hot topic in the mainstream media and among internet commentators. Of course, those of us who came to the marijuana liberation struggle from a spiritual perspective, with a special interest in the medicinal uses of the sacrament, have always known that marijuana would turn into big business once people got a chance to use it without punishment. But it’s really booming now.

For example, A story published by the Cannabis Law Group looks forward to the “all-but-inevitable legalization for recreational use” of marijuana in California this fall and reports that “investors are preparing for the day when legalization comes.

“In fact, such explosive growth is expected in the cannabis business and so much profit is expected to be generated, the situation is being described as ‘a new California gold rush’ as new businesses open, new products come into the marketplace, and new investor money comes in.”

The story explains that “the cannabis industry is an underground industry which is tremendously profitable. It’s now becoming investible for the first time. As cannabis businesses come out of the shadows, industry revenue is expected to leap from $2.7 billion in 2014 to around $11 billion by 2019.

“New and innovative products are being developed every day, including a whole new product category consisting of the world’s first cannabis distillery, as well as new vaporizer and accessories products.“

On a smaller but not insignificant scale, the state of Louisiana is looking into growing and selling medicinal marijuana products now that the Louisiana Legislature has approved a bill that legalizes the use of marijuana for people suffering from a specific list of debilitating diseases.

“The so-called medical marijuana legislation authorizes LSU and Southern University to grow and produce cannabis to be consumed in a liquid form,” Tyler Bridges reports in The New Orleans Advocate, asking in a headline: “How Much Might LSU, Southern, Companies Profit? How Will It Be Distributed?”

And what about the private companies that are now “emerging to try to profit from the new industry by partnering with the universities”? LSU and Southern both report getting calls from representatives of companies that want to rent or sell land or provide a growing facility, while others are inquiring about financing the entire venture with the expectation of earning a profit. “It’s a money-making venture,” Bridges quotes a Southern University official.

On an even deeper level, Karen Turner writes in the Washington Post that “Microsoft Becomes The First Big Tech Company To Get Into The Legal Weed Industry” by “partnering with a cannabis industry-focused software company called Kind Financial to provide ‘seed to sale’ services for cannabis growers that allow them to track inventory, navigate laws and handle transactions—all through Kind’s software systems.“

Tunrer notes that “the partnership marks the first major tech company to attach its name to the burgeoning industry of legal marijuana,” but I’m sure it won’t be the last. Wait until the big pharmaceutical companies get their hands on cannabis!

In fact, one of my favorite sources, Wonkblog, just published a piece by Christopher Ingraham about “Why Pharma Companies Are Fighting Legal Marijuana.” They’re fighting now but, so far as I can see, it’s basically a holding action to keep down progress toward legalization of weed while they figure out how to coopt our natural medicine and bring it into their own highly profitable domain.

But there’s a lot of fascinating information in Ingraham’s story, which points to “a body of research showing that painkiller abuse and overdose are lower in states with medical marijuana laws.

“In the 17 states with a medical-marijuana law in place by 2013, prescriptions for painkillers and other classes of drugs fell sharply compared with states that did not have a medical-marijuana law.

“In medical-marijuana states,” Ingraham reports, “the average doctor prescribed 265 fewer doses of antidepressants each year, 486 fewer doses of seizure medication, 541 fewer anti-nausea doses and 562 fewer doses of anti-anxiety medication.” That’s a lotta missing doses!

“But most strikingly,” he concludes, “the typical physician in a medical-marijuana state prescribed 1,826 fewer doses of painkillers in a given year.”

For many of us this is great cause for celebration. But guess what?  “These companies have long been at the forefront of opposition to marijuana reform,” Ingraham reveals, ”funding research by anti-pot academics and funneling dollars to groups, such as the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, that oppose marijuana legalization. Pharmaceutical companies have also lobbied federal agencies directly to prevent the liberalization of marijuana laws.”

Big Pharma makes a strange bedfellow for the law enforcement and prison guard unions that typically lead the charge against marijuana legalization, but when the pharmaceutical industry adjusts its chops to the taste of selling lega cannabis medication, they stand to make big profits while their allies will lose their ill-gotten powers for good.

In closing, It may be kind of a sick thing to say, but the War On Drugs, like legally-enforced racial segregation—with full recognition of their evil intent and inhuman effect—actually resulted in the creation of some beautiful lifeways and cultural constructs developed outside of and in opposition to the Americo-Puritan paradigm that in many ways were far superior to the ones we have now.

Under legal segregation black business and entertainment districts thrived, and there was a palpable sense of community among the citizens of the black ghettoes that hasn’t existed since the one-way street of integration was bulldozed through the black communities of our nation.

By the same token, the culture of interdependence, cooperative farming, underground economics and spiritual sharing that grew up in the wake of the insane marijuana laws created a life for many of us that no longer exists, even though we can buy our weed over the counter now in many locations. But the cost of freedom from imprisonment has been to surrender our identities and become mindless consumers of whatever the pot industry wants us to purchase.

On a personal note, my friend Maryjane Bunker has recently left the Grannies For Grass group to pursue a pair of initiatives of her own: Cannabis Information & Education, an on-line service she writes me “is reaching 3.8 million this a.m.,” and Puff, Puff, Paint, an organization set up to integrate puffing and painting in the process of art therapy. I had some great times when she brought me to Grannies For Grass events, she’s an accomplished and very generous grower, and I wish her every possible success in this next stage of her adventure.

P.S. I started out to say that when I visited Leslie Lopez’s studio in the Noord, it was in an abandoned police station! And we had quite a few laughs sharing a joint and listening to music where the police used to do their ugly business. FREE THE WEED!
—Amsterdam
July 21, 2016

© 2016 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

Free The Weed 64 by John Sinclair

June 24, 2016

Highest greetings from Amsterdam, where I’m spending the summer in a very interesting section of the city called the Bijlmer that used to be a terrible fear-ridden slum on the outskirts of town but has been redeveloped by the government as a sort of art-centered multi-cultural neighborhood populated by people of many descriptions, from dark-skinned immigrants to young white urban professionals with real jobs and a certain quotient of bohemians both black and white.

The interesting thing is that, unlike in the States, the immigrant population of the former ghetto was not expelled to make the renovated area  “safe’ for white people but was included in the redevelopment plans and rehoused as an integral component of the upgraded neighborhood. The oppressive 1950s-style Stalinistic eight-storey project dwellings were razed and replaced with buildings of no more than four floors and the whole thing painted in bright colors marked by diagonal stripes of orange, yellow, green, bright blue, and lots of third-world murals.

I’m staying in the spacious apartment of a new friend named Tariq Khan, a Dutch Rastafarian with big dreads who started out as a rapper called MC Lazy but now is an energetic artistic and cultural activist with his own recording studio in the building around the corner that also houses a hip-hop radio station called Hot Twenty that’s staffed by local youths. Tariq also produces and directs video shoots for many purposes and conducts youth workshops for community groups, but his day job is working for the Sensi Seeds empire at the Hash, Marijuana & Hemp Museum one day, the Cannabis College the next and the Sensi Museum Gallery on Thursdays, where he joins my old friend Joseph who mans the vaporizer and gets people high all day.

What a job! Joseph has been around for a long time and knows everybody who’s into anything in terms of the cannabis culture—he’s even regarded as a spiritual leader in some advanced quarters—so I turned to him when I was desperate to find a place to lodge for the summer after my week-long residency in the Sensi guest quarters was up at the end of May. He hooked me up with Tariq, and Tariq took me straight to his place in the Bijlmer and set me up like a champ.

Sensi Seeds is a remarkable enterprise started by a guy named Ben Dronkers in Rotterdam a long time ago, first as one of Rotterdam’s initial coffeeshops and then as a way to get marijuana growing in Holland by supplying top-quality seeds and encouraging local growers to plant and harvest them. Over the past 30 years Sensi has grown into a mammoth operation known as “the most comprehensive cannabis seed bank in the world,” dispensing millions of seeds to funky farmers all over the world and then pioneering the revitalization of the hemp industry as well.

As the Sensi Seeds website explains, Ben Dronkers started growing marijuana in 1975 and began saving the seeds he found in good quality weed, eventually collecting and categorizing all the cannabis seeds he could find. From the end of the 70s until the mid-80s Ben travelled the world from Central Asia and the Hindu Kush to the Himalayas, down through the subcontinent to Southeast Asia and around the tropics, seeking out the best genetics and focusing on regions famous for their ancient cannabis traditions.

Around 1984 Ben began several cross-breeding programs in order to develop new cannabis hybrids. He gained access to the first examples of the new stabilized hybrids from the US—including Haze and Skunk—and took the final step required for the creation of new, world-class hybrids in Europe. By 1985 he had founded the Sensi Seed Club, expanding and centralizing the process of creating hybrids and keeping meticulous records of plant genealogy and interrelations.

In 1991, Ben bought another seed company from a breeder who had also been working with the US hybrids since the 80s and merged the two companies to form the Sensi Seed Bank. In 1994 he founded HempFlax, a company dedicated to growing and processing industrial hemp, and successfully revived the once-thriving Dutch hemp industry. in 2006 Ben acquired the Flying Dutchmen seed company when his friend the owner decided to retire, and he consolidated its venerable stock with the existing Sensi Seed Bank to make an even more comprehensive collection of cannabis strains.

The great thing about Ben Dronkers and Sensi Seeds is that it isn’t just about raking in the profits like most of the people in this great industry of ours. Sensi has garnered millions of dollars in sales over the years, but—aided and abetted by his friend Ed Rosenthal, the great American cannabis activist—Ben has dedicated a significant portion of his earnings to the creation of public benefit institutions like the Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museum, the Sensi Museum Gallery, and the Cannabis College, which was initially a project of Flying Dutchmen. Among many other things, The Gallery displays Old Masters painted hundreds of years ago which depict ordinary men and women enjoying the smoking of cannabis.

Now these institutions are lined up on the Achterburgwhal in the Red Light District in the center of town, making up a sort of Green Light District of their own along with the Sensi Seed Bank itself and the Sensi Corner Store, formerly the Sensi coffeeshop where I used to hang out and got to know all these incredible people that make up the Sensi empire.

One of my fondest memories of the Sensi coffeeshop was the day I sat down with Ben Dronkers at a table inside and listened while he carried on an intense conversation with a South American man who turned out to be a minister in the new government of Bolivia led by the former coca famer and now head of state, Evo Morales. Evidently Ben and Evo had met and even toked down together on Morales’ visit to Amsterdam before the Bolivian election, and Ben was making a impassioned plea that the new government consider completely legalizing marijuana and establish Bolivia as the world center of cannabis enlightenment.

Dronkers promised that he would move his entire cannabis empire to Bolivia and encourage the international growing community to do likewise, bringing incredible amounts of new revenue to the small South American nation and transforming it into a haven for the worldwide cannabis community of suppliers, growers and consumers.

I listened with rapt attention as Ben’s argument unfolded, but the Bolivian minister calmly explained that there was no chance that the church and moral authorities would let them get away with it, no matter how great an idea it might be. Ben was visibly dejected, but I guessed he was accustomed to official rejection of his visionary ideas and the conversation passed on to more mundane topics.

Well, there were several other topics I’d meant to discuss in this month’s column, but I got carried away thinking about the greatness of Sensi Seeds and now I’m out of space for this time. Of course I continue to feel that one day cannabis will be granted its rightful place in our world of oppression, but it’s never going to be an easy proposition and we’ll just have to keep on fighting every way we can until that happy day. FREE THE WEED!

—Amsterdam
June 24, 2016

© 2016 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

Free The Weed 63 by John Sinclair

May 22, 2016

Highest greetings from Amsterdam, where I’ve just returned for the summer (if all goes well) to continue my efforts to set up my personal foundation called Stichting John Sinclair in order to make a proper repository for my life’s work, my intellectual properties, copyrighted writings and albums, and artifacts of my creative endeavors including my poetry and book manuscripts, master recordings, and related materials.

I’ve always preserved the materials created by my work as an artist and activist with an eye to the future when I’m no longer here, and in the past I’ve created an archive at the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan for most of the materials and artifacts I’ve amassed over more than 50 years of activity so far. When I moved from Detroit to New Orleans 25 years ago, I left my Detroit jazz archives with the Museum of African American History so they would be available to Detroiters into posterity.

Now I want to create something that’s more than an archive and also more directly under my intellectual control so I can preserve my works in poetry, music, journalism, recording, performance and broadcasting in perpetuity and in a single digital realm. This has been my dream for years, to gather all my things together in one place and make them available long after I’m gone. You can call it an ego trip if you want to, but any sort of artistry is a true ego trip in the sense of following the mental trips one’s self takes and follows in the course of making something in art and of one’s life.

There’s also the evidence of my work outside the art and music world as a cultural and political activist, a relentless opponent of the War On Drugs and a zealous proponent of marijuana legalization all my adult life. I had the honor and the pleasure of kicking off the marijuana movement in Michigan 50 years ago, and in my old age I’m trying to hang on long enough to see the battle won once and for all.

I helped campaign for the first marijuana ballot initiative in California in 1972 and returned to Ann Arbor to make the first feeble attempt to launch a Michigan Marijuana Initiative, beginning a trajectory that hopefully will culminate as a result of the current efforts of MILegalize in full legalization in our state following the November elections this year. At the same time I had the privilege of assisting in the institution of the $5 marijuana law in Ann Arbor, and I was on the Diag for the first Hash Bash and helped for several years to make sure it continued to take place on the first Saturday in April every year.

In more recent years I’ve appeared in support of marijuana legalization at MassCann in Boston, in Seattle and Oregon and Denver and Maine, and frequently in Michigan in many diverse settings. Now, since I first came to Amsterdam as High Priest of the Cannabis Cup in 1998, I’m part of the cannabis culture here in the long-time marijuana capitol of the world, and I’m striving to unite all these strains of my life in one location under the aegis of the John Sinclair Foundation.

I’ve been blessed in my work and my widespread travels over half a century to make legions of friends all over America and Europe, and I’m calling on them now to help me build my foundation. My friend and long-time supporter Sidney Kuijer of the Ceres Seed Company and the Hempshopper stores has backed my internet radio station at RadioFreeAmsterdam.com, my own website at johnsinclair.us and my FaceBook page for most of the present century, and he’s agreed to serve as the head of the Stichting John Sinclair.

My friend and roommate in Amsterdam for the past several years, drummer, deejay, webmaster and producer Steve “Fly Agaric 23” Pratt, now in Bristol, is playing a key role in the organizational effort and is creating a new website for the Foundation that will integrate the several sites I work from now, including the site he maintains for us called Fattening Blogs For Snakes.

The Fly is also going to direct our crowd-funding project on Indie-Go-Go that launches this month and will run for the next 60 days, working with another friend and Stichting board member in Bristol, guitarist, nightclub manager and former charitable fund-raiser Dylan Harding. Another board member, Jerry Poynton, now in Athens, organized and maintains the literary estate of his late friend Herbert Huncke, the original literary character who helped bring together and inspire Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs to create what became known as the Beat Generation, to which we all owe our present existence—including the central place of marijuana in our lives.

In Amsterdam we’ve just gained the valuable participation of Kai van Bentham, an ex-Canadian community arts organizer and web specialist, and Marianna Lebrun, bassist, translator and activist. Finally, my long-time friend Hank Botwinik, mime, actor, and veteran media manipulator, has agreed to join our board of directors and help us reach our organizational goals. Hank and I started Radio Free Amsterdam together with our late comrade Larry Hayden on January 1, 2005, and he sponsors our programming stream at streema.com.

For the past ten years Radio Free Amsterdam has been my central passion in life, and I’ve spent thousands of hours creating original programming for the John Sinclair Radio Show and other series, gathering original radio programs from fellow deejays Bruce Pingree, Leslie Keros, George Klein, Steve The Fly, Elisa Mancini, Tom Morgan, Cary Wolfson, David Kunian and others, editing these shows into one-hour episodes, annotating and attaching playlists for each show, posting the episodes on the Radio Free Amsterdam site, archiving every program posted for perpetual access, and reposting each episode to our live stream server at streema.com.

This is a lot of work for one old guy, but I derive so much pleasure from this activity and it serves both artistic and educational purposes: I believe I’m creating a serious, carefully organized, fully accessible archive of American roots music programming—blues, jazz, gospel, soul, funk, Afro-fusion, reggae and other classic forms—and presenting the music in the classic radio format that gave me my life in music, with knowledgeable deejays sequencing the music and commenting on it from their own unique viewpoints.

First of all it’s something you can listen to as an alternative to the horseshit radio and media programming of today, and my pledge is that if you listen regularly to Radio Free Amsterdam for a year, you’ll have a whole different perception of what good music is about, where it came from, how it developed, and why we should always give it a central place in our lives.

Radio Free Amsterdam is on-going as the central focus of the John Sinclair Foundation, and our fund drive, if successful, will allow us to secure proper licensing for the music we play, upgrade our delivery system and our website, and provide for continuous promotion of the station so we can turn more people on to our mix of Blues, Jazz & Reefer at RadioFreeAmsterdam.com

That’s the end of my sermon for today, but I hope I can convince you, my readers, to check out the John Sinclair Foundation fund drive at Indie-Go-Go and our new website at TheJohnSinclairFoundation.org. We’re seeking people who will join the Foundation as members and support us in our efforts to develop and grow into a self-sustaining alternative institution. And, by the way, FREE THE WEED!
—Amsterdam
May 22, 2016

© 2016 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

Free The Weed 62 by John Sinclair

May 10, 2016

Highest greetings from Detroit, where I’m spending my last week before crossing the ocean to appear at a Detroit Artists Workshop exhibition in London and then on to Amsterdam for as long as I can get away with it.

April is always a great time for me to be in Michigan, and except for the day-long snowfall at the Hash Bash in Ann Arbor at the top of the month, which didn’t really seem to dampen too many spirits out on the Diag and on Monroe Street for the festivities, I’ve had a great time celebrating the sacred weed in various settings all month.

Following the Monroe Street Fair there was the annual Hash Bash celebration at the Blind Pig where I get to perform with Brennan Andes and Ross Huff from the Macpodz and their musical comrades for the occasion. Oh yeah, and there was the before party hosted by the Third Coast people from Ypsilanti at a big house in the country where I had the pleasure of hanging out with Dan Skye, editor of High Times, listening to music by an impromptu ensemble headed by my old pal Muruga, and then spending the night in one of their splendid guest rooms so I could make it to the Diag on time the next morning.

On April 16 I had the privilege of attending a water purification ceremony organized by Native Americans from the area and conducted by elders and spirit leaders of the Potawatomie nation. This beautiful ritual culminated with the passing of the sacred pipe among all the participants and the offering of traditional Potawatomie prayers for the cleansing of the river and all waters.

As the pipe was offered to each person and passed from the pipe carriers to the people one by one, I was reminded that this is where our practice of toking and passing the joint came from in the first place and how toking and smoking together have their origins in spiritual communion with all our relations and the universe itself.

The sharing of marijuana has become farther and farther removed from its spiritual roots as the cannabis culture has become more and more commodified and commercilaized over the past half century since we were first introduced to weed by our brothers in the ghetto and supplied with our sacrament by growers in Mexico and our intrepid comrades who brought it to us despite the incredible obstacles in their path—particularly their relentless pursuit by the drug police every step of the way.

Now that the police are gradually but inexorably being removed from our lives as marijuana smokers (or whatever delivery system one may choose), I’d say that it’s a good time to return to our roots and embrace the concepts of spirituality and ritual celebration that once served as the underpinnings of our relationship with the weed.

The coffeeshop concept that prevails in Amsterdam and the Netherlands is much closer to the traditional practice of marijuana smokers than what we are seeing now in Michigan and elsewhere weed is being permitted to be bought and sold in public. I’ve spent some delightful hours in compassion centers like GC3 in Flint and The Herbal Centre in Mt. Morris, where I just spent the 4/20 holiday, because along with the availability of multiple locally-grown strains of great weed offered by the producers themselves in a cooperative, “farmers market” sort of environment, these establishments also provide smokers with a special room where we can sit with fellow patients and smoke our weed in peace and fellowship.

My experience with the modern dispensaries of Michigan is fairly limited since I have a care-giver who supplies me with my medicine and other caring growers who make me gifts of their produce, so I rarely have to pay over the counter while I’m here. But what I’ve experienced almost invariably is that, despite the fact that their product is marijuana in immediately usable form, the provisioning centers want you to make your choice, buy your medicine and beat it without delay

Frankly, this is the opposite of what I’m looking for in a marijuana provisioning center. What I’m looking for is the opportunity to get together in a congenial setting with other smokers like myself and get high together, share our herb and our experiences, listen to music together, engage in relaxed conversation and, when we move on, take some weed home with us. I submit that this is a more civilized and humane system for taking care of the needs of medical marijuana patients, or humans of any stripe for that matter, than we are afforded here under their present scheme.

The proliferation of provisioning centers throughout Michigan and particularly in Detroit should have led to a superior form of organization for the dispensaries that would include the on-site ingestion of weed in a comfortable, friendly atmosphere, but this prospective organic development has been stymied by the attack on the compassion centers by the Detroit City Council and the DPD. Instead of allowing these innovative installations to evolve and flower into more perfect entities, the City is trying to make sure that regression will be the only course allowed.

In the first place, instead of being ecstatic that over 200 new businesses have opened in the city, many in seriously dilapidated areas, in response to the legalization of medical marijuana several years ago, the City administration is trying to reduce the number of care centers to what Detroit Corporation Counsel Melvin “Butch” Hollowell claims will be “approximately 50 Medical Marihuana Caregiver Centers in various locations in the city.”

As Chris Feretti reports in the Detroit News, Butch holds that “the city’s medical marihuana regulations are lawful, fair and reasonable. We will continue to enforce compliance in the courts, while concurrently processing the applications submitted for medical marihuana caregiver center licenses.”

About 195 applications overall have been submitted. Of those, 74 are seeking to operate in what the city calls “drug-free zones,” Hollowell said. A group of caregiver centers brought suit against the City in March when their applications were turned down outright when the City claimed each of the dispensaries was located in a so-called “Drug Free School Zone.” The lawsuit was filed because the City provided the appplicants no means to appeal, but the suit was dropped before it could be heard.

As Peretti reports, “The federal Drug Free School Zone Act prevents the drug from being delivered, sold or manufactured within 1,000 feet of a school. State law also factors libraries into the rule. The city’s zoning regulations cover educational institutions and goes beyond that, prohibiting shops from operating near child care centers, arcades and outdoor recreation facilities.”

I’m leaving Detroit this week so I’ll have to follow this issue from afar, but while I’ve been here I couldn’t help but notice the many green outlets and how good they looked against the desolate landscape of Detroit. Comrade suppliers, you’ll be in my thoughts and prayers until my return. FREE THE WEED!

—Detroit
April 25, 2016

© 2016 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

Free The Weed 60 by John Sinclair

May 5, 2016

Highest greetings from New Orleans, where I was greeted for Mardi Gras with the splendid news that the New Orleans City Council is about to pass an ordinance virtually decriminalizing marijuana possession in the Crescent City, largely due to the work of Kevin Caldwell and the organization called Legalize New Orleans and to Council member Susan Guidry, who introduced the measure.

“Under the proposed municipal law change,” nola.com reports, “a first-time offender could get off with a verbal warning. A second-time offender could get a written warning, then a $50 fine the third time” and a $100 fine any time after that. “Police will now be able to use their discretion,” the report continues, either issuing a summons under the municipal code or making a custodial arrest using state marijuana possession laws.

Since Council member Guidry introduced the original ordinance in 2010 that redefined first offense simple possession, “We have found that the police officers 70% of the time are writing out a summons rather than taking someone to jail,” Guidry said. “Most importantly,” nola.com adds, “research shows that the NOPD’s discretionary use of summonses has been applied evenly by race.”

But according to New Orleans Municipal Court and NOPD records cited by nola.com, African-Americans still account for 75% of all misdemeanor marijuana arrests and 92% of all felony marijuana arrests (whether by summons or custodial arrest). “This is unacceptable and not in line with the demographics of our city or the reported demographics of marijuana users,” Council member Guidry said.

Guidry says she hopes the ordinance will “free up police, save money and make application of marijuana laws more fair and just across ethnic and economic backgrounds.” She wants police on the street investigating murders, rapes and armed robberies, “rather than at the station spending countless hours booking individuals on victimless, non-violent crime.

“These marijuana arrests clog our already overburdened court systems and public defender’s office. Also, when indigent defendants cannot afford the hefty state law fines for possession offenses, they end up clogging our jail for failure to pay. Those offenders then struggle to get back on track once released. They can’t bond out and they wind up losing their job, then they get out and they are really in desperate circumstances, and really it makes the severity of the punishment much more than the severity of the crime,” Guidry said.

That’s some of the most sensible municipal wisdom to be encountered today, and this grizzled veteran of the marijuana legalization wars would like to commend and thank Ms. Susan Guidry for leading the way to common sense in New Orleans.

In Detroit, however, the City Council is gallopoing off in the opposite direction, even though the citizenry has voted to legalize marijuana for medical (2008) and recreational (2012) use and the cannabis community has opened up more than 200 public dispensaries to serve the needs of local smokers.

This has happened in the most natural fashion and absent any supervision or regulatory system devised by the city government. Now they want to corral the dispensaries and impose stringent post-facto legal strictures that are based in the usual idiocy of War On Drugs policies.

The Detroit City Council has adopted a report pretentiously titled “Medical Marihuana Caregiver Center Application Process Status Report For Detroit City Council” and identified 211 dispensary locations in the city.

According to Rick Thompson of The Compassion Chronicles, the new medical marijuana rules will begin on March 1 and any dispensary now open in the city has only until March 31 to apply for a business license. Most of the applicants will also have to apply for a zoning variance, Thompson adds, ”as the city was extremely stingy on the number of locations properly zoned for the inappropriately-named caregiver centers.”

There isn’t enough space in this column to go into every detail of the Detroit dispensary ordinance, but Richard Clement, Marijuana Policy Analyst for Council Member George Cushingberry, suggests that anyone interested in viewing the relevant documents visit www.detroitmi.gov/Government/City-Council/George-Cushingberry/Newsletters-and-Documents

Let it suffice to say that the ordinance is full of tricks and traps that are designed to deprive as many people as possible of access to their medicine. First off, all operational dispensaries must apply for their licenses in the month of March—period. Up-front costs include a Site Plan Review for $160, an initial Conditional Hearing for $1000, a Board of Zoning Appeals Hearing for $1200, and, as Rick Thompson points out, the price of the business license itself is yet to be determined.

Once the licensing fee is established, the businesses will have to purchase the initial license in the spring and will be forced to renew their license and pay the fee again in September.

The whole thing is based in the kind of backwards, police-state ideology so assiduously developed in the service of the War On Drugs. For instance, anyone who cultivates marijuana in a residence will be required to register with the city of Detroit as a home-based business. The registration process involves inspection and approval by numerous city agencies.

Further, dispensaries cannot be less than 1000 feet from another such business, from a park recognized by the Recreation Department, from a religious institution that has received a tax exemption from the city, or from a business identified as a controlled use (topless clubs and liquor stores). The City has specified a few industrial districts where dispensaries may be less than 1000 feet from each other to allow for clustering of similar businesses.

What happens if you don’t follow the rules? Rick Thompson asks. “Any premises, building or structure in which a medical marihuana caregiver center is regularly operated or maintained in violation of the standard included and incorporated in this Code shall constitute a public nuisance and shall be subject to a civil abatement proceeding initiated by the City of Detroit.”

What’s even worse, Thompson reports in a follow-up piece, the Detroit Police Department raided more than a dozen medical marijuana dispensaries in February despite assurances that businesses of that type will begin licensing procedures on March 1.

“The Detroit Police raids are a tortious interference with a business expectancy,” Royal Oak attorney Barton Morris told Thompson. “The recent Detroit Police raids are unlawful and unconstitutional. The city should be legally estopped from taking any action to an issue they created and allowed.”

“The current policy to shut down, raid and deny safe access is a losing hand to play,” said Michael Komorn, an attorney from Southfield. “Medical cannabis is a public health issue, not a public safety issue.”

“The City has not only allowed dispensaries to operate by providing them certificates of occupancy, they enacted an ordinance to license and zone them,” Barton Morris pointed out. “At the same time, they send the Detroit police to raid select dispensaries purporting to enforce state law. That is the ultimate hypocrisy.”

“These raids are discriminatory in nature and further persecute caregivers and the patients who need safe access to their medicine,” said Bruce Leach of Kirsch Leach PLC of Birmingham. “So many people will be negatively impacted by these raids; many will be thrown into the criminal justice system.”

It will be interesting to see what happens in March, and we’ll be following this procedure very carefully. Incidentally, this is my 60th column for MMM Report—one every month for the past five years. If all goes well, the column will continue here for at least another five. FREE THE WEED!

—New Orleans

February 20-21, 2016

© 2016 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

Next Page »