John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth (Double CD) 8th September 2017

March 15, 2017

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth” on Double CD
Released 8th September 2017 by Iron Man Records.

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

Catalogue Number: IMB6032

Release date: 8th September 2017

Label: Iron Man Records

Distribution: Cargo

Disc 1

  1. Testify (9.10)
  2. Good Stuff (4.32)
  3. Everybody Needs Somebody (7.09)
  4. Change My Life (5.14)
  5. Ain’t Nobody’s Business (3.36)
  6. My Buddy (5.13)
  7. That Old Man (3.53)

Disc 2

  1. Brilliant Corners (11.29)
  2. Culture Cide (11.38)
  3. Red Dress (Ruby My Dear) (6.25)
  4. Sitarrtha (6.16)
  5. Do It (6.16)
  6. War On Drugs (6.18)

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary releases “Beatnik Youth” on 8th September 2017 on Iron Man Records. The double CD contains over 80 minutes of music from the restless creative mind of Youth, with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers.

John Sinclair - Beatnik Youth

You can pre-order the Double CD, Vinyl and T-shirt here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John’s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his ‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zig-zag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Youth

Youth has been responsible for numerous hits from artists including The Verve, Embrace, Echo and the Bunnymen, Crowded House, The Orb, Sir Paul McCartney and The Charlatans. Among his recent projects was the co-production of Pink Floyd‘s final and largely instrumental album, The Endless River. Youth also remixed David Gilmour‘s current solo album, Rattle That Lock. The Verve’s Urban Hymns brought Youth a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year after three consecutive years of nomination.

Youth says “I’m very proud of the longevity of work on Killing Joke and The Orb, how those recordings still sound fresh… and what I’ve done with The Verve and Richard Ashcroft, and Paul McCartney (The Fireman) and Pink Floyd. It’s only really working with those guys, with my insecurities, that I felt as though I could go, ‘yeah, I am a producer’.” His “university” was Killing Joke after he left school, and it “doesn’t really get more intense than that”.

As a young musician Youth, whose real name is Martin Glover, cut his teeth doing bass sessions for Adrian Sherwood productions and for artists such as Kate Bush whose phenomenally successful Hounds of Love album had Youth on bass. He was also a founder member and bassist of the band Killing Joke. After leaving Killing Joke (and a short experiment with the band Brilliant, managed by Bill Drummond and featuring June Montana, Jimmy Cauty and other key innovators of electronic and indie dance music), Youth began working with Alex Paterson and Cauty as The Orb, a collaboration that was responsible for the introduction of chill-out ambient house music.

Cauty and Drummond eventually moved on to form The KLF, leaving Youth and Paterson to experiment extensively in the post punk British dance music and Acid House scene. This led to the release of two classic albums as The Orb – U.F.Orb and Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, which incorporated Little Fluffy Clouds, a track that defined ambient house and chill-out and brought these genres firmly into the mainstream.

Youth’s skills as a producer were now being noticed by a much wider audience, not least because of his remix work with band like Siouxsie and The Banshees, Malcolm Maclaren, A Guy Called Gerald, Fine Young Cannibals, Marc Almond and U2. In 1993, he collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney who had developed an interest in remix culture. This resulted in Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, an ambient album – and the first of three critically acclaimed albums – released under the name of The Fireman.

Over the years, Youth has notched up a staggeringly large and varied list of production and remix credits for artists such as Yazz, James, Primal Scream, Gun’s N’ Roses, Blue Pearl, Art of Noise, P.M. Dawn, Shack, De La Soul, Erasure, Beth Orton, Bananarama, Maria McKee, Suns of Arqa, The Shamen, Kool and the Gang, Texas, Pete Murphy, Tom Jones and Dido. He remains tireless in his quest for inspiration, excellence and innovation in recording great music and also finds time to paint, illustrate and publish poetry.

John Sinclair

John Sinclair the White Panther firebrand who stoked the MC5’s insurrectionary manifesto has roots that stretch back to jazz and the beats, as a writer, avant-garde champion and poet. John has travelled the world, collaborating with like-minded souls; a living embodiment of the original free spirit that fought to emancipate a generation, one of the few still flying the freak flag.

Since the early 90s, Sinclair has released albums of his poetry, but Beatnik Youth is possibly some of John Sinclair’s best work to date.

This poorly served generation needs it: that militant energy which released the bats in the 60s is crucially booted into the 21st Century in a riotous celebration of personal freedom, cultural trailblazers and marijuana.

The following Iron Man Records Patrons have made this release possible:

Suzy Tweddle, Deborah Ritchie, Scott Roe, Margaret Calleja, Thomas Rathgeber, Dan, Lee Parsfield, Chris Scales, Muir Mathewson, Michael Howe, Jonathan Harris, Dave Barnard, Bill Fadden, Mike Burgess, Jachim Palm, Lyle Bignon, Thomas Burke, Ben Cartlidge, Matt Grimes, Toby Conyers, Chris, Andy Cavendish, Steve Wyatt, Andrew Dubber, Frank Knoblich, Vaughan Roberts, Ian Robertson, Marcus H….

Become a Patron too https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient (500 copies on Vinyl) 28th July 2017

March 15, 2017

John Sinclair – “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Vinyl.
by Iron Man Records.

Pre-order the Vinyl here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante.co.uk

Catalogue Number: IMB6033

Barcode: 5060132273319

Label: Iron Man Records

Release Date: 28th July 2017

Distribution: Cargo

Side A

Do It (6:16) Recitation – John Sinclair, Music – Youth, Mix – Youth and Michael Rendall

Brilliant Corners (11.29) Recitation – John Sinclair, Produced by Youth

Side B

War On Drugs (6:18) Recitation – Howard Marks, Music – Youth, Mix – Youth and Michael Rendall

Sitarrrtha (9:19) Recitation – John Sinclair, Produced by Youth

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary will release “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Iron Man Records. The record is over 30 minutes of ambient, chill out music from the restless creative mind of Youth with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, this year, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers, Youth has also hand drawn the beautiful cover artwork.

The record features 4 ambient tracks including 2 tracks completed in late 2015. Do it and War on Drugs were composed and produced by Youth with words By John Sinclair and Howard Marks. John Sinclair presents some illuminating words of wisdom on the life of the artist in the opening track Do It, while Howard Marks delivers some lost last words in War on Drugs on side B. The Mood is maintained by 2 extra ambient tracks taken from the Beatnik Youth album simultaneously released by Iron Man Records on Double CD. The free-form cinematic Brilliant Corners is a homage to Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs and the smokily atmospheric Sitarrtha reflects on the work of John Coltrane.

The record is a smoker’s dream with the 4 ambient tracks clocking in at just over 30 minutes.

LP-3.5mmSPINE_GZ.qxd

You can pre-order the Vinyl, Double CD and T-shirt here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his ‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth Ambient is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zigzag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Youth

Youth has been responsible for numerous hits from artists including The Verve, Embrace, Echo and the Bunnymen, Crowded House, The Orb, Sir Paul McCartney and The Charlatans. Among his recent projects was the co-production of Pink Floyd‘s final and largely instrumental album, The Endless River. Youth also remixed David Gilmour‘s current solo album, Rattle That Lock. The Verve’s Urban Hymns brought Youth a BRIT Award for Producer of the Year after three consecutive years of nomination.

Youth says “I’m very proud of the longevity of work on Killing Joke and The Orb, how those recordings still sound fresh… and what I’ve done with The Verve and Richard Ashcroft, and Paul McCartney (The Fireman) and Pink Floyd. It’s only really working with those guys, with my insecurities, that I felt as though I could go, ‘yeah, I am a producer’.” His “university” was Killing Joke after he left school, and it “doesn’t really get more intense than that”.

As a young musician Youth, whose real name is Martin Glover, cut his teeth doing bass sessions for Adrian Sherwood productions and for artists such as Kate Bush whose phenomenally successful Hounds of Love album had Youth on bass. He was also a founder member and bassist of the band Killing Joke. After leaving Killing Joke (and a short experiment with the band Brilliant, managed by Bill Drummond and featuring June Montana, Jimmy Cauty and other key innovators of electronic and indie dance music), Youth began working with Alex Paterson and Cauty as The Orb, a collaboration that was responsible for the introduction of chill-out ambient house music.

Cauty and Drummond eventually moved on to form The KLF, leaving Youth and Paterson to experiment extensively in the post punk British dance music and Acid House scene. This led to the release of two classic albums as The Orb – U.F.Orb and Adventures Beyond The Ultraworld, which incorporated Little Fluffy Clouds, a track that defined ambient house and chill-out and brought these genres firmly into the mainstream.

Youth’s skills as a producer were now being noticed by a much wider audience, not least because of his remix work with band like Siouxsie and The Banshees, Malcolm Maclaren, A Guy Called Gerald, Fine Young Cannibals, Marc Almond and U2. In 1993, he collaborated with Sir Paul McCartney who had developed an interest in remix culture. This resulted in Strawberries Oceans Ships Forest, an ambient album – and the first of three critically acclaimed albums – released under the name of The Fireman.

Over the years, Youth has notched up a staggeringly large and varied list of production and remix credits for artists such as Yazz, James, Primal Scream, Gun’s N’ Roses, Blue Pearl, Art of Noise, P.M. Dawn, Shack, De La Soul, Erasure, Beth Orton, Bananarama, Maria McKee, Suns of Arqa, The Shamen, Kool and the Gang, Texas, Pete Murphy, Tom Jones and Dido. He remains tireless in his quest for inspiration, excellence and innovation in recording great music and also finds time to paint, illustrate and publish poetry. All original artwork on the sleeve was hand drawn by Youth.

John Sinclair

John Sinclair the White Panther firebrand who stoked the MC5’s insurrectionary manifesto has roots that stretch back to jazz and the beats, as a writer, avant-garde champion and poet. John has travelled the world, collaborating with like-minded souls; a living embodiment of the original free spirit that fought to emancipate a generation, one of the few still flying the freak flag.

Since the early 90s, Sinclair has released albums of his poetry, but Beatnik Youth Ambient is possibly some of John Sinclair’s best work to date.

This poorly served generation needs it: that militant energy which released the bats in the 60s is crucially booted into the 21st Century in a riotous celebration of personal freedom, cultural trailblazers and marijuana.

The following Iron Man Records Patrons have made this Vinyl release possible:

Suzy Tweddle, Deborah Ritchie, Scott Roe, Margaret Calleja, Thomas Rathgeber, Dan, Lee Parsfield, Chris Scales, Muir Mathewson, Michael Howe, Jonathan Harris, Dave Barnard, Bill Fadden, Mike Burgess, Jachim Palm, Lyle Bignon, Thomas Burke, Ben Cartlidge, Matt Grimes, Toby Conyers, Chris, Andy Cavendish, Steve Wyatt, Andrew Dubber, Frank Knoblich, Vaughan Roberts, Ian Robertson, Marcus H, Seth Faergolzia, Ricky Lee, Kathryn McCormack, Ade Cartwright, Sunwoo Jung….

Become a Patron too https://www.patreon.com/ironmanrecords

This Week: Total Assault On The Culture

September 24, 2016

Patron-Logo-Banner-1600x400px

Bandcamp
Work has started on uploading the Iron Man Records Catalogue on Bandcamp. To start with all releases will be available for £5 or you can Stream the releases and listen for free. All Releases are available on most of the download and streaming platforms already but for those of you who want an alternative to Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon, Google, Youtube, Facebook and all the other main providers, Bandcamp seems good.

Back In Five Years:
Some people wonder what on earth I do for a living. Well, I earn money working as a Tour Manager. I spend all the money I earn trying to keep Iron Man Records going. Here’s a life in a couple of weeks:

Support Insanity A6 Postcard No Marks
Become A Patron
If you want to contribute to the work of Iron Man Records, here’s How To Burn Money – Become A Patron of Iron Man Records

Cosmic Trigger
Steve Fly and Simon Reeves start work on post production this week. Simon spent three days last week recording Oliver Senton reading Cosmic Trigger 1 by Robert Anton Wilson. Here’s a picture of Simon and Oliver at Framework Studio, Birmingham, on completion of the great work.

fullsizerender-1
Framework Recording Studios, Birmingham.
Framework Studios has worked with Napalm Death, Carcass, Cathedral, Meathook Seed, P.J.Harvey, Ride, Family Cat and other acts including Piss On Authority, Police Bastard, Spirit Bomb, Drongos For Europe, Selfless, Cerebral Fix and more. Telephone Simon (UK+44) 07790 158210 or email siframework@gmail.com

Vinyl Test Pressings:
I’m waiting on test pressings of John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient to arrive and also test pressings of Police Bastard – Confined. Exciting times.

Pre-order John Sinclair – Beatnik Youth Ambient on VINYL
LP-3.5mmSPINE_GZ.qxd
You can pre-order the Vinyl, Double CD and T-shirt here:  http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com/artist/john-sinclair

All Press enquiries to Sean Newsham : sean@mutante-inc.demon.co.uk
Catalogue Number: IMB6033
Release date: April 2017
Label: Iron Man Records
Distribution: Cargo

Side A
Do It (6:16) Recitation – John Sinclair, Music – Youth, Mix – Youth and Michael Rendall
Brilliant Corners (11.29) Recitation – John Sinclair, Produced by Youth

Side B
War On Drugs (6:18) Recitation – Howard Marks, Music – Youth, Mix – Youth and Michael Rendall
Sitarrrtha (9:19) Recitation – John Sinclair, Produced by Youth

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary releases “Beatnik Youth Ambient” on Iron Man Records. The record is over 30 minutes of ambient, chill out music from the restless creative mind of Youth with some fine spoken word and poetry delivered by John Sinclair.

John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today continues his work for cultural transformation.

Youth is one of the UK’s most influential producers and has been honoured, this year, with an Outstanding Contribution Award by the Music Producers Guild. His career spans more than 30 years and is one of the UK’s most consistent, credible and influential producers, Youth has also hand drawn the beautiful cover artwork.

The record features 4 ambient tracks including 2 tracks completed in late 2015. Do it and War on Drugs were composed and produced by Youth with words By John Sinclair and Howard Marks. John Sinclair presents some illuminating words of wisdom on the life of the artist in the opening track Do It, while Howard Marks delivers some lost last words in War on Drugs on side B.

The Mood is maintained by 2 extra ambient tracks taken from the Beatnik Youth album simultaneously released by Iron Man Records on Double CD. The free-form cinematic Brilliant Corners is a homage to Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs and the smokily atmospheric Sitarrtha reflects on the work of John Coltrane. The record is a smoker’s dream with the 4 ambient tracks clocking in at just over 30 minutes.

From Detroit to New Orleans and from Los Angeles to Amsterdam, John Sinclair is still the king-size, psychedelic old-gangster poet, a living legend, a veteran of the counterculture, a survivor of the Marijuana Wars, and one of the last bohemians still standing. As a co-founder of the Detroit underground newspaper The Fifth Estate, manager of MC5, and Chairman of the White Panther Party described on Wikipedia in these modern times as a far-left, anti-racist, white American political collective founded in 1968 and dedicated to cultural revolution his mark on the boho rock & roll underground has been unique.

In 1969, with Richard Nixon in the White House, Vietnam in chaos in the wake of the Viet Congs near-suicidal Tet Offensive, and American cities still scared and scarred from urban riots, even the comparatively harmless agitprop pranks of White Panther cultural revolution had those in power reaching for their metaphoric and sometimes actual revolvers. Authorities remembered how John had organized the MC5 playing outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the only band actually able to perform before Mayor Daley’s rabid police department violently derailed the massive anti-Vietnam war rally with teargas, billy clubs, and helicopter support.

John was deemed a danger to society and set up like a bowling pin. After handing a couple of joints to a hassling hippie who turned out to be an undercover narcotics agent, John found himself on the bad end of a ten year jail term. At the same time though he became a cause celebre. Free John Sinclair became one more battle cry in an embattled era. Protests, propaganda, and a giant concert in Ann Arbor headlined by John Lennon and Yoko Ono ultimately resulted in John s release in November 1971. Lennon even wrote a song about him called ‘John Sinclair’ which he included on his
‘Sometime In New York City’ album.

In common with much that happens with John, a meeting with producer Youth (Paul McCartneys ‘Fireman’, Primal Scream, The Verve etc & Killing Joke bass player) that sowed the creative seeds was a matter of stoned synchronicity. As former Track Records boss Ian Grant tells it, Alan Clayton told me he had John Sinclair coming round tomorrow. I said “The John Sinclair?” One night Zodiac (Mindwarp) was on the bill with the Dirty Strangers and Youth was very taken with John. “I want to make a jazz album with John” he said. Since then, the two met at Youths house whenever he was home, and when John was in the country, and recorded the album.

And through the course of those recordings John, always so associated with the 1960s, took a serious step into the ways of the 21st century, with the same intoned poetry, but with melodic backing vocals, highly inventive production, even a nod to hip-hop, but still remembering his first loves of blues, be-bop, and classic rock & roll.

Beatnik Youth Ambient is one more step in the Big Chief’s long zigzag trip that seems set to continue all the way to the far blue horizon. Summing up John Sinclair, you can only say with certainty that the beatnik goes on.

Fuk Reddin – Music Festival 28/29/30th Aug 2015 at T-Chances, 399 High Rd, London N17 6QN

August 21, 2015

Fuk Reddin - Music Festival 28/29/30th Aug 2015 at T-Chances, 399 High Rd, London N17 6QN

Annual Bank Holiday weekend punk festival at the best DIY venue in London. Booze, punk rock, bands from UK and beyond.

Fuk Reddinhttp://fukreddinfest.tumblr.com

Venue: T-Chances, 399 High Rd, London N17 6QN

4pm till late each day.
Advance tickets: Day £10, Weekend £25
On the door: Day £12, Weekend £30
Cheap Bar and food available + Distro stalls etc
No Blaggers, No Dogs, No Troublemakers

Day splits in no particular order

FRIDAY

Black Water County, Butcher Baby, Defcon Zero, Eat Defeat, Nembutal, Noise Complaint, Police Bastard, Smokey Bastard, Ratio Zero, Svetlanas, Tarantism, Mind

SATURDAY

Bucha Effect, Count Spatular, Damidge, Clunge Plunger, Declaration of War, Luvdump, Nuke On Route, Obscene Revenge, Primeval Soup, Revenge Of The Psychotronic Man, Tosserlad, Toxic Bonkers, Volatile Idea

SUNDAY

Public Order Act, AntiBastard, Baptist Killing Spree, Atterkop, Blatoidea, Deadneck, Jakal, Flowers of Flesh and Blood, Dysteria, John Player Specials, Lamo, Sanction This, Varukers

There’s still a few more to be added so watch this space

Advance tickets – £25 for weekend/£10 per day
http://fukreddinfest.tumblr.com/

Pre-sales will go off sale Monday 24th August at midday

On the door tickets – £30 for weekend/ £12 per day

Nearby Hostels

Bell and Hare
724-726 High Road
London N17 0AE
(10 min walk from venue)

Fountain Hotel
125 West Green road , London, N15 5DE
(5 min walk from Seven Sisters Tube Station, which is a 10 min walk from the venue)

Woodberry Tavern,
618 Seven Sisters Rd London N15 6JH
(5 min walk from Seven Sisters Tube Station, which is a 10 min walk from the venue)

Arsenal Tavern Hostel
175 Blackstock Road, London, England N4 2JS
(Arsenal/Finsbury Park – one bus, 15 mins)

Journeys King’s Cross
54-58 Caledonian Road, Kings Cross, London, England N1 9DB
(KINGS CROSS – one tube(Victoria Line to Seven Sisters) + 10 min walk)

Clink78
78 King’s Cross Rd, London, England WC1X 9QG
(KINGS CROSS – one tube(Victoria Line to Seven Sisters) + 10 min walk)

Beaconsfield Hotel
357 359 Green Lanes, London, N4 1DZ
(2 busses from venue – approx 20 mins)

Smart Camden Inn
55-57 Bayham Street, Camden, London, England NW1 0AA
(Camden – 2 busses from venue – about 30 mins)

St.Christophers Inn
48-50 Camden High St, London NW1 0LT
(Camden – 2 busses from venue – about 30 mins)

John Higgs – “Stranger than we can imagine: Making Sense of The Twentieth Century” Book Launch

August 19, 2015

Friday 28th Aug 2015 - An evening with John Higgs and Guests

Friday 28th Aug 2015

An evening with John Higgs and Guests

Heavenly Social presents an evening with John Higgs and Guests

To celebrate the publication of his new book

Stranger Than We Can Imagine:

Making Sense of The Twentieth Century

Friday 28th August

7pm-1am

Free

The Social, 5 Little Portland Street, W1W 7JD

Nearest Tube Oxford Circus

The Social.com

Sun Ra Memories by John Sinclair

December 6, 2014

John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

My first real exposure to the music and legend of Sun Ra came in the fall of 1964, when drummer Roger Blank passed through Detroit with a jazz trio I can’t remember the name of.

We put him up for a few days in our stronghold at the Detroit Artists Workshop Cooperative Housing Project, and I watched Roger open his suitcase and pull out what were obviously his most prized possessions: two weird LPs on the El Saturn label with garish outer space art on the covers and names like Supersonic Jazz and Jazz in Silhouette.

I had read about the avant-garde Chicago pianist and bandleader in downbeat and other jazz magazines, but his music was still so far underground that few people outside the band’s immediate orbit had ever heard it.

By this time the apocryphal Jazz by Sun Ra album on Transition Records was long out of print, and only The Futuristic Sounds of Sun Ra (Savoy, 1961) was currently available.

I knew the Arkestra had moved to New York City and taken the creative music community by storm, but its music was still pretty much only a thing of legend and not something you could put on your turntable and listen to at will.

Blank regaled us with tales of Sun Ra and his fantastic Arkestra—how they all lived together in a tiny apartment at 48 E. 3rd Street on the lower east side of New York City, where at least a dozen grown men crammed into a three-room pad and rose each day for the mandatory noon rehearsal.

John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

They might go for months without an actual gig, working religiously on mastering the uniquely imaginative compositions and arrangements created for them by their leader with no hope of more than a musical reward.

By 1964 Sun Ra and his long-time partner in Chicago, Alton Abraham, had launched their own label, El Saturn Records, but the fledgling company seemed to distribute its products strictly on a hand-to-hand basis.

Seeing two of them now, popping out of Roger Blank’s suitcase in Detroit, sent thrills coursing throughout my being—they were so rare it was like the answer to a prayer.

Soon Sun Ra would release two startling albums—The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra, Volumes 1 & 2—on the new avant-garde jazz label ESP-Disk, which finally brought his music to the attention of the jazz world at large.

On a trip to New York City in the fall of 1966 after I’d been released from a 6-month prison sentence at the Detroit House of Correction, I made a pilgrimage to 48 E. 3rd and spent some time with Sun Ra and the Arkestra, even managing to interview the enigmatic composer for our underground paper in Detroit, the Warren-Forest Sun.

One evening I showed up at the pad with my tiny Opel sedan just in time to serve as the major transport for the Arkestra’s gig that night at the Jazz Arts Society of New Jersey in Newark, where they ended up playing for just about as many people as were in the band—about 15.

In the spring of 1967 I arranged for the Arkestra to make its first Detroit appearance at the Community Arts Auditorium on the Wayne State University campus, a 600-seat venue. They shared the bill with the MC-5 and the Magic Veil Light Show and played to maybe 100 people.

John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

The gate receipts were so miniscule that one of the members of our Detroit commune, Emil Bacilla, ended up driving the Arkestra back to New York City in his Volkswagen bus because we were unable to pay the band’s transportation costs.

During my tenure (1967-69) as manager of the MC-5, I shared with the band my unbridled enthusiasm for Sun Ra’s musical message and his cosmic space philosophy. In 1968 the MC-5 developed a piece called “Starship,” a wild space odyssey in the amplified-guitar-and-rock-drums idiom into which the singer Rob Tyner incorporated Sun Ra’s poem, “There / is a place / where the sun shines / eternally….”

“Starship” made it onto the 5’s first album for Elektra Records, with Sun Ra sharing composer’s credit with the MC-5.

In the spring of 1969 I arranged for Sun Ra and the Arkestra to come out to Michigan for a month-long residency. We rented the house next door to our commune at 1510 Hill Street in Ann Arbor for them and presented the Arkestra in concert with the MC-5 at several area venues, including Detroit’s Grande Ballroom, the Ann Arbor Armory, and as headliners at the First Detroit Rock & Roll Revival festival at the Michigan State Fairgrounds, where they headlined with Chuck Berry and the MC-5 in a bill designed to showcase the past, present and future of the music.

When I had the opportunity to select the artists for the 1972 Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival, I scheduled Sun Ra & the Arkestra to close the first night’s show, following performances by the Seigel-Schwall Blues Band, the Contemporary Jazz Quintet (CJQ), Junior Walker & the All-Stars and Howlin’ Wolf.

Sun Ra completely wowed the crowd of 12,000 with the Arkestra’s spectacular presentation of space-age improvisational music, brilliant costumery and frenzied choreography. On the Atlantic Records 1972 Festival album, the audience can be heard chanting “Sun Ra! Sun Ra! Sun Ra!” for several minutes following the end of the Arkestra’s performance.

Sun Ra’s 1973 appearance was more highly anticipated than ever before. Now he was incorporating his philosophical disquisitions into the stage show itself, casting his views into verse and presenting them via a three-part vocal chorale to stunning effect.

John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

A new suite based on the previous year’s smash success, “Space Is the Place,” had been prepared to introduce Ra’s concept of an “Outer Space Employment Agency” which would put the idled workers of post-industrial America back into a productive mode outside the tired orbit of Earth.

The Arkestra was again a big hit at the 1973 Festival, and they were scheduled to return for the 1974 event when hassles with the Ann Arbor city government impelled us to move the Ann Arbor Blues & Jazz Festival to Windsor, Ontario, just across the river from downtown Detroit.

I was trying to shepherd the Arkestra through Canadian customs when I was singled out and deported back to Detroit on the basis of a marijuana conviction 10 years previously.

I went back to my room in the Shelby Hotel and watched myself talking to a television news reporter covering my deportation proceedings.

This experience marked a major turning point in my life when I considered that the farthest-out group of characters I had ever seen in America was allowed entry to Canada, while I was turned back as “too far out.”

“You’ve gone too far,” I said to myself. “It’s time to turn back now.”

That fall I retired from political activism and the rock & roll scene to take up less grueling pursuits, working as an alternative journalist and editor for a couple of years and then opening a small community arts consulting business focused on providing program development and grant-writing services to indigenous jazz artists and organizations.

This led to the establishment of the Detroit Jazz Center in 1979, and by the end of 1980 the Jazz Center was presented with the opportunity to bring in Sun Ra and the Omniverse Jet-Set Arkestra for a week-long residency in downtown Detroit.

Rick Steiger, an aspiring young saxophonist and bandleader (Kuumba, the Sun Messengers, the Sun Sounds Orchestra) from the east side and a regular participant in the Jazz Center’s various activities, came to me with an attractive proposal: He had just inherited a couple of thousand dollars from a dearly departed relative, and he wanted to use this windfall to finance a trip to the Motor City by Sun Ra & the Arkestra.

John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

He would engage the band for the week between Christmas and New Year’s; we would lodge them at the Jazz Center, present the Arkestra in a series of concerts in our after-hours performance space called the Jazz Gallery, and host daily workshops with the band where local musicians could meet, hang out, study and play with the members of the Arkestra.

After a full week of nightly concerts which were carefully taped for posterity, culminating in three shows on New Year’s Eve, Sun Ra ended his residency at 6:00 am January 1, 1981 by sending band representative Danny “Pekoe” Thompson down to the studio where I was packing up the results of our live recording sessions.

Pekoe asked if we’d like to co-produce an album from the tapes with them, and I was curious as to what that would involve. When he mentioned that they would want us to pay for issuing the record, I explained that there was nothing in the Jazz Center’s pitiful budget for such a project.

“Oh, man,” he sighed, “Sun Ra says just reach down in that oil money and pull some out—they won’t miss it.”

And there it was: for something like 15 years, while I had sacrificed all available funds, energy, and even my reputation at times to present the Arkestra in Michigan as often as possible, Sun Ra had taken me for an heir to the Sinclair Oil Company fortune!

I saw Sun Ra after that many times over the years and never failed to recall that shocking conversation. I would continue to appreciate the music and performances of the Arkestra as long as Ra lived, but the avid idealism which had driven me to pursue these great feats of derring-do would never again return.

John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

From “Sun Ra Visits Planet Earth” in IT’S ALL GOOD: A JOHN SINCLAIR READER (London: Headpress, 2009) © 2009, 2014 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.)

The square root of the M25: Gimpo’s 25 Hour M25 Spin

December 5, 2014

A witness statement from Iron Man Records 2014.
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I didn’t get much sleep the night before, I had been working on the release of the new John Sinclair record “Mohawk.” By the time I climbed into the car and started the engine it was 10am. I drove to London and dropped the car in Brentford, West London. I picked up the keys. I had a 9 seater VW Splitter van on hire from DYC Touring and headed to Shepherd’s Bush. I wasn’t due to meet the band until 3pm so I had a bit of time to park up and make phone calls.

If I was applying for a job I’d probably tell you I’m a tour manager, a music manager, I can drive a splitter van and tow trailers, and I have a clean driving licence. I could tell you I’ve been running a record label called Iron Man Records for 18 years, I play in a couple of bands, I run a few websites, I work freelance and so on. In reality, I don’t apply for jobs, employers find their way to me on personal recommendation because no one else, in a right mind, will take their work on. The day was looking no different to any other. The phone was ringing.

I have to do many things on a daily basis just to keep things moving, some of it for money, some of it for free, some of it because I have no other choice and some of it for reasons of pure nonsense. Don’t ask me to explain.
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Gimpo was due to start the 25 hour M25 Spin at midday, so by now he should have completed a lap and be half way round the next one. The time was 2pm and my phone was lighting up with messages from people asking if I was on the Spin this year. No, I wasn’t on the Spin, I was driving a band called “Tenterhook” to Hereford for a gig at The Jailhouse. They needed a driver and had a small budget to work with. I had no money, and on that basis I was “available” to do the work. Gimpo was planning to do the M25 Spin solo this year. You can’t reason with someone like Gimpo. He thinks things up and goes and does them. No Discussion. No Explanation.

I had decided to leave him to it for now. For various reasons Tim, who usually drives the van for the whole 25 hour M25 Spin, was unable to make it this year. Sharon, who handles Navigation and supplies while Tim is at the wheel, was stuck in Guatemala with no money for a plane ticket. Todd, who looks after the website www.GimpoGimpo.com was in New Jersey, I already had several messages from him asking “What the fuck’s going on?”
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Did I know what was going on? Can anyone know what’s going on in Gimpo’s mind? I managed to speak to Tim, he had been in touch with the man himself. Gimpo had made a start, but had only got half way round. Tim was worried about progress. Gimpo hadn’t got very far and Tim had been questioning Gimpo at length. “Half a lap? What are you doing? Selling Ice Cream? Get a move on, there’s work to do” It seemed to me that Gimpo was having technical problems. Gimpo was driving his own car this year in an attempt to do the M25 Spin solo for the first time. This might all sound pretty good, but the reality was a little different.

The CD player was broken in Gimpo’s car and the radio doesn’t really do it these days. Gimpo had fixed up the video camera with cable ties, and had a stock of blank mini DV tapes at the ready. But, there were a few other issues that hadn’t been thought through. You cant drive and text can you? You cant drive and take pictures can you? You cant drive, take pictures, text, answer the phone, send emails or reply to requests can you? So what was Gimpo to do? He was already on the M25 spin. Solo. No support. And how was he going to document the event? He had stopped at Clacket Lane Services to discover this was going to be a long and complicated day. He had an iphone, with a SIM card, which gave him free internet access but the camera on his Nokia phone was better. For some reason the Nokia wouldn’t send emails so Todd wasn’t going to get any picture updates for the website.
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I rang Gimpo, as time was moving on, to find out what he was up to. Gimpo would not be stopped by anyone. Gimpo was doing the M25 spin and he would do it solo with or without anyone knowing about it. I had to go, it was nearly 3pm, the band needed to be in hereford for 6pm. I told Gimpo I would come and find him when I got back after the gig. He would have to go it alone till then.

3pm arrived and I found myself collecting a band, who are being managed by one of the few capable music management companies I know. They look after Madness, so no joke, they are going to do good things with this lot. The band are actually a singer and songwriter with a great voice who plays the guitar and goes under the name of “Tenterhook,” he’s 19. He works with some other musicians who play drums, guitar, bass and keys. The van was loaded and by 3.15pm we were on the road, to Hereford. The gig was just like any other I’ve been to. Headliners took for ever getting their soundcheck done, they didn’t really speak to anyone and then vanished. The lot I was with sound checked and agreed last details like set order, start and finish time, and made a start on the limited rider provided by the venue staff.

By now there was a long list of messages and emails asking what the fuck was going on? Where was Gimpo? Was he ok? What did I know? Had I heard anything? The Spin was on, nobody needed to know. Gimpo was at the wheel and with that thought in mind, it’s probably better not to know what’s going on.
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“Tenterhook” didn’t go onstage till much later than planned. The band had a good one, it was their first gig and the applause gave the band the endorsement they were hoping for.

Outside the band members gathered to load the van while people came out of the the venue to chat and find out who they were, and where they had come from. It was their first gig together.

On the way back to London the beers opened, and the talk poured over the gig and what had just gone on. The band knew how much work was ahead but it seemed like a good start to the process.

I dropped the band back at 5am and taxis were waiting to take people home from the meeting point. “Where are you going now, where are you staying?” came the inevitable question. I unloaded the gear and handed it to the exhausted band members. “Don’t ask, you don’t want know” was my reply. I could see there were a load of messages that had come in on my phone while I was driving back from Hereford. I dared not even look till the van was parked, the gear unloaded, and the band already gone.

The phone was full of madness. I called Gimpo and found him at Clacket Lane Services. He had just pulled in to try and send some pictures to Todd. No change there then. I suggested we meet at Cobham services, only 30 minutes further round, to talk through what was going on.
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I arrived at Cobham around 6am having dropped the splitter van back to DYC Touring on the way. The parking at Cobham is free for 2 hours then its £25 for up to 24 hours. As I despaired at the parking situation Gimpo arrived, “Don’t worry about parking Mark, lets book a meeting room for £8 the parking is free with that” I wasn’t about to try booking a meeting room at 6am on a sunday morning. Neither of us looked in any way believable and if we booked a meeting room and then vanished it may generate suspicion. We defaulted to the only option available, a cup of tea from Greggs and a meeting in the comfy chair area to work out what sort of plan might be possible under the circumstances.

Gimpo started emptying his pockets of leads, head phones, charger cables, car keys, phones and assorted other items. He explained the problem. “Ive got this iphone but you need two hands to work the camera. This Nokia has a better camera, and you can work it one handed, but I can’t get it to work. I can’t send emails to Todd.” I looked at both and tried to have a go at getting the Nokia to work. It was full of pictures, but no, the internet wasn’t working and I couldn’t work out how to get it to send and receive.

We finished the tea and returned to the vehicles. Gimpo spoke first. “Lets drop your car off on the A3, I know a place where Bill and Jimmy took a load of Journalists in the middle of the night. Ockham Common, It’s where we showed the money nailed to a piece of wood”. Back to reality, that sounded like a great idea even if no one would even remember or believe the basis upon which the suggestion had been made. I digress. I refused to pay £25 to park my car, that’s a waste of money isn’t it? I followed Gimpo back onto the M25 and just one stop further on we turned off onto the A3 and headed south for a few minutes. On the left is Ockham woods and there’s a car park with free parking. I parked my car and took what valuables I had with me. The early morning doggers looked on as Gimpo explained at length and in detail about his previous visits with Bill and Jimmy. I listened with interest as the story poured out and I transferred my stuff to Gimpo’s car. I didn’t have to time to think about the rest.
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In a few minutes Gimpo was back on the M25 and the Spin continued. Gimpo looked worn out but determined. This was his M25 spin, he was the artist here, and no one was going to stop him. This was his first solo M25 spin. The phone rang and Gimpo activated his hands free set, it was Tim. Tim sounded like he was checking in to be sure that nothing had gone wrong, Gimpo passed the phone across. “Hi Mark, is everything all right?” he asked. Tim and I chatted a while longer and I handed the phone back. Gimpo continued on with the story about the phone, versus camera, versus driving solo problem. And then Tim was gone, and the spin continued.

Next up was “Give Peas a Chance” Bridge, just north of J16 where the M25 crosses the M40. We headed North while Gimpo endlessly flipped from one radio station to the next, attempting to find anything worth listening to, whilst broadcasting his irritation at the fact the cd player was broken and he had no “modern music” to listen to.

Gimpo drove at a steady 56 miles an hour. “The price of bloody fuel these days Mark, it’s a rip off” He said. “The spin gets more and more expensive every year, the only thing I can do is drive at what the car manual says is the most economical speed. 56 miles an hour. It’s not a race.”

Gimpo turned off at J23, South Mimms, he wanted to get some fruit juice and have a driving break. He parked up and as we both walked into the services he spotted four “Beat The Street” double decker tour buses parked up. “That’ll be Elton John or some other shit I bet” he said. “Who do these people think they are?”
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Once inside I got a dissertation on the pros and cons of Krispi Kreme Donuts and Gimpo’s theory on who buys them, how, and why.
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Back outside Gimpo showed me how he had stuck his signs to the roof of the car with gaffer tape. Only the truck drivers or bus passengers would see. We got back in the car and Gimpo set to work labelling and loading the next tape to go in the video camera. We headed back onto the M25 and I got the full account of Spin Island, the only island on the M25. Gimpo wants to plant an Argentinian Flag on it. He says he’d like to buy it and give it to the owners of Stott Hall Farm, between J22 and J23 on the M62. The story goes they refused to sell up and move house when they built the M62 Motorway over the Pennines so by rights, they should have spin Island too. Gimpo says there’s a hot spring on Spin Island. That’s why they had to split the motorway to go around it.

Onwards through a couple of tunnels then it was up over the Queen Elisabeth Bridge. Traditionally the spin starts at midday on the Saturday, top dead centre on the Queen Elisabeth Bridge. Descending on the other side Gimpo only uses Toll booth number 23. Gimpo paid the toll and as the barrier went up it was almost exactly 9am.
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Next stop was Clacket Lane Services, “Doggers Delight!” Gimpo declared. “They put a rat trap in the hedge just there but the rat dug a hole underneath it.” More fruit juice and a quick driving break before moving on to Cobham and the lap was completed. Gimpo still couldn’t find anything to listen to on the radio. He switched it off in despair. “Where’s Tim?” he shouted, “He always has the music, we need Tim here to put the music on.”
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Gimpo explained he wanted to do the last lap by himself so he dropped me back to my car. A committed artist. I collected my car and followed Gimpo back onto the M25. Some things just can’t be explained. Gimpo is making the worlds longest road movie. He wants to know where the M25 goes. His plan is to drive round the M25 every year on the closest Saturday night/Sunday morning to 21 March each year for 25 years. Gimpo has 7 years left to completion.
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I looked across at the other drivers as they passed by on their way to nowhere, circling the nation’s capital. Another ruin of a world city. Gimpo was ahead at a steady 56mph, unmoved in his commitment to the work. Who would know who was in the car in front? An artist alone at work. An artist without a name or a country. An artist who has nothing in common with you. An artist filming the world’s longest road movie in an attempt to find out where the M25 goes. An artist with no gods and no masters. The M25, the London Orbital Motorway, 117 miles of open road where Gimpo is the artist. One man, just getting into it for himself.
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Mark – Iron Man Records. 2014

Tour Management Services

November 26, 2014

Luxury Splitter Vans for Hire- Driving You Crazy 2012

Iron Man offers Tour Management Services to bands and artists.

Tour Management – A professional solution for touring artists, providing a reliable service at a reasonable price. I can help organise the administration for a schedule of appearances, contacting each promoter or venue to ensure the clients technical and hospitality demands are met. I ensure the work remains within the budget. I will take care of the day to day planning and management of activities on the road, and any unforeseen issues or emergencies should they occur. Some recent clients have included: Seasick Steve, John Paul Jones, Madness, The Stone Roses, Killing Joke, Adam Ant, Roland Gift, Fatoumata Diawara, Talib Kweli, Little Barrie, House of Pain, Vagina Monologues, Ivo Papasov, Sierra Meastra.

Transfers – A simple and cost effective transfer service to or from the airport, the office, an exhibition, or an event.

Backline and Gear Moves – A reliable service to pick up or drop off backline, gear or trailers depending on your need. I use a suitable panel van, splitter van, or a Land Rover Defender, which will pull a Trailer (with a ramped load-on/off) capable of moving up to 2 tonnes of gear.

Email: mark@ironmanrecords.co.uk
Telephone: Mark (+44) 07974 746810

I can help with Merchandise, Production, Backline, Crew, Rehearsal, Recording, Press, Promotion, Online strategy and equipment storage.

From the point of pick up, to the final destination, your client is in safe hands. I offer a courteous and helpful service with an eye on safety and security. You and your clients can relax as I understand the importance or being discreet, reliable and friendly.

Safety and comfort is of utmost importance. All vehicles are always in a technically and optically perfect condition. Furthermore, all vehicles are non-smoking and undergo regular interior and exterior cleaning.

Email or Call for more info: Mark (+44) 07974 746810

Tour Management and Transfer Services

I can be found frequently in Birmingham, Cardiff and London.

Luxury Splitter Vans for Hire- Driving You Crazy 2012

Tour Management Services

Most of my work is based around Tour Management in the Music Industry but I have also worked with the Theatre and Film Industry.

I have played in all sorts of bands myself over the years, I’ve organised 1000’s of gigs as i used to put on regular shows in Birmingham, I’ve set up tours, managed bands, put together press kits, pr and promotion strategies, worked out online strategies for artists big and small, I run a record label, and I’ve dealt with all sorts of madness along the way. I have an understanding of most problems, pressures and issues that performers and their crew may face. I’ve taken a lot of people to a lot of gigs from living rooms, small venues, squats, warehouses, TV and Radio Stations to major music venues and festivals of all shapes and sizes.

I have a clean driving licence with a C1 and D1 which means I can tow trailers and drive any car, van or splitter.

Vehicles

I’m a freelance. I work for you, not the hire company. This means that if you employ me I can find you a good vehicle or trailer or anything else you might need so that’s less work you have to do. I can source Splitters, Gear vans, Cars, Minibuses…anything you might need.

Online Strategy

I have an active interest in internet and social media. If you’re interested in how I could help with your, or your artist’s on-line presence get in touch.

Rates

I charge per day. A day is 8 hours, after the first 8 hours I charge per hour. The hours run from when I collect the vehicle for the work until I return it.

Alternatively, I also charge a ‘set day rate’. This is negotiable, in advance of the work, depending on what you want me to do. Longer term clients tend to be on a set day rate, It works out cheaper and no one has to watch the clock.

I expect PDs and buyout/catering on any work where I’m away overnight, and buyout/catering on any day over 8 hours.

Some recent Artists / Clients

Seasick Steve, John Paul Jones, Madness, The Stone Roses, Mika, Killing Joke, Adam Ant, Roland Gift, Fatoumata Diawara, Anthrax, Modestep, Talib Kweli, Little Barrie, House of Pain, The Enemy, Friendly Fires, Crystal Castles, Bullet for my Valentine, The Orb, Barry Adamson, Vagina Monologues, Taio Cruz, Jay Reatard, Nightingales, Ivo Papasov, Sierra Meastra, Endbutt Lane, The Rakes, The Magistrates, Soulsavers, As I lay Dying, Roisin Murphy, Police Bastard, Dufus, Arrows, Ladytron, Son de la Frontera, Jeffrey Daniel, Johnny 2 Bad, XOVA, Johnny Foreigner and many others…..

(Long Wheel VW Crafter Splitter Van shown above is an example of the type of vehicle I most often use when working with Clients.)

The Nightingales – Free download & October 2014 gigs

October 20, 2014

Nightingales - Out of True

Following a hiccup earlier in the year, thanks to a studio in Birmingham erasing four ‘Gales recordings (yeah really), the band are pleased to announce that their free download Covers Club is up and running again. Please take a listen to the latest cover version and forward the link to your family and friends.
http://thenightingales.bandcamp.com/

Also… the Nightingales along with their mate Ted Chippington are playing a few shows this month in remembrance & in celebration of John Peel who died ten years ago on October 25

Wed 22 – LONDON, Dublin Castle + I, Ludricous & The Mighty Clang Band (Clive Langer w/ Andy McKay & others, including Suggs?)
http://www.wegottickets.com/event/278323
https://www.facebook.com/events/304440333082020/

Fri 24 – SCARBOROUGH, Corporation Club + Eton Crop, Crumplehorns, The Subterranean Gentlemen & Lottie Holmes
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/scarborough-john-peel-day-10th-anniversary-gig-with-the-nightingales-tickets-12473044211
https://www.facebook.com/events/570950153024782/

Sat 25 – STOCKTON ON TEES, Georgian Theatre + Blue Orchids, Terry And Gerry, The Wolfhounds, Inca Babies, Eton Crop,
A Witness, The Great Leap Forward, Crumplehorns, The Things, Pellethead & Terry Edwards
http://www.ticketsource.co.uk/bigfigurepromotions
https://www.facebook.com/events/489508031195030/

Mon 27 – SHREWSBURY, The Vaults + Heartbeat Wunderbar
http://www.caroline-true-records.com/products/john-peel-celebration-evening-nightingales-ted-chippington-the-vaults-shrewsbury-monday-27th-october-2014
https://www.facebook.com/events/508165502653020/

www.thenightingales.org.uk
www.facebook.com/thenightingalesuk
https://twitter.com/_Nightingales

You can buy all sorts of Nightingales stuff in the Iron Man Shop

John Sinclair + The Founder Effect – Spiegeltent, Canary Wharf, London 17th Sept

August 24, 2014

John Sinclair at 12 Bar Club, London, Sunday 11th May 2014
John Sinclair and The Founder Effect perform songs from ‘Mohawk’ at Canary Wharf Spiegeltent, London

Download the Spiegeltent Leaflet PDF here

“John Sinclair – renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary…..an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, still kicking with both feet on his trajectory for cultural transformation. Mohawk features ten tracks from his book of verse: always know: a book of monk. Beatnik poems, great odes and personal reflections of the Be-Bop jazz persuasion, all flowering together.”

Doors – 6.00pm
John Sinclair on stage 6.30pm – 7.45pm
Tickets available through SEE Tickets for £10 + Booking Fee

All Press Enquiries Sean Newsham: sean@mutante-inc.demon.co.uk
All Guest List requests to: Ben Conway ben@peterconwaymanagement.com

TUBE Jubilee Line to Canary Wharf DLR Canary Wharf or Heron Quays

LONDON BUSES D3, D7, D8, 135, 277

THAMES CLIPPERS Canary Wharf to
Central London in 23 minutes, 26 times a day. thamesclippers.com / 0870 781 5049

LONDON TRANSPORT INFORMATION tfl.gov.uk
John Sinclair at The Barbican 31st May 2014

John Sinclair and The Founder Effect at Barbican, London, 31st May 2014.

WHITE PANTHER: The Legacy Legacy of John Sinclair – a short film by CHARLES SHAW featuring JOHN SINCLAIR music by THELONIUS MONK

John Sinclair is best known as the Sixties “marijuana” activist who was sentenced to 10 years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover policewoman. He was eventually freed when John Lennon and Yoko Ono spoke out on his behalf.

Less understood is his role as the founder and chairman of the radical anti-war group, The White Panther Party, an offshoot of the Black Panthers. The Black Panther Party was a militant political organization formed after the brutal murders of Martin Luther King, Malcolm X and Robert Kennedy.

The Nixon Administration and the FBI launched a secret program called COINTELPRO to disrupt and ultimately destroy the Black Panthers and the Anti-War movement. As part of this program, John Sinclair was set up and imprisoned on marijuana charges. When the government could no longer justify denying him a bond over two joints, they falsely charged him with a Federal conspiracy to blow up a CIA station, in order to make him disappear.

You can find John Sinclair Books, CDs and other interesting stuff in the Iron Man Shop

John Sinclair + The Founder Effect – Spiegeltent, London 17th Sept poster

Ticket Link: http://www.seetickets.com/event/john-sinclair-and-the-founder-effect/spiegeltent-at-canary-wharf/810282

John Sinclair - Mohawk front cover

John Sinclair – “Mohawk” CD  March 2014 by Iron Man Records, Birmingham.

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary released his new album in March 2014. John, has been described as an Archetype of the 1960’s art, music and literary synthesis, and who today, is still kicking with both feet on his trajectory for cultural transformation. His new record features ten tracks from his book of verse: always know: a book of monk. Twenty poems planted firmly in a single-shot session, and carefully trimmed down to ten exhibits for this album. Beatnik poems, great odes and personal reflections of the Be-Bop jazz persuasion, all flowering together.

First conceived of in Detroit City, spring 1982, and developed throughout the 1980s with streaks of fresh edits leading right up to the session itself, John navigates some of these texts for the first time in over twenty years, free-styling his energized sincerity and attention to every word, transforming the text on the page into his unique unmistakable spoken word.

The music was written and arranged by Steve Fly who mirrored John’s poems in the music by initially combing the tempo of the original songs recorded by John ‘Dizzy’ Gillespie, Charlie ‘Bird’ Parker and Thelonious Monk.

Steve The Fly is a native of Stourbridge UK, now an Amsterdam resident who plays drums, spins vinyl, writes novels and literary and cultural commentary. He also maintains a flock of websites and works in various other art forms without visible restraint. His other music projects have included New Flesh, Garaj Mahal, Temple Dragon band, of course he is now full time with John Sinclair.

These songs are further utilized by John’s poetic method so that each title and the rhythm of his poetry can piggy-back upon the same song title, and rhythm, of an original composition set in history, for extra rooting. Steve put down drums, turntables, cello-bass, flute, and glockenspiel, shooting to play around the vocal lead lines and diverse expressions from John.

“to take the hair off
the sides of the head

& leave just a strip
along the top,
scalping pretense
for the baldness of statement

building a new music
on the bones of the old

— John Sinclair from the title track “Mohawk”

John Sinclair - Mohawk gatefold inner

The album was recorded diligently by Tim Egmond at Ei Studios, Amsterdam and passed along to Simon Reeves at Framework Studios, Birmingham for mastering.

Tim Egmond is a music producer, engineer and studio whizz, based in Amsterdam, who has worked with scores of international and locally based artists on a wide variety of projects.

Simon Reeves has completed many projects for Iron Man Records already and he has been described as one of Birmingham’s finest independent studio engineers who has worked with bands from Napalm Death to Police Bastard, and a host of other brutal metal and punk bands.

All artwork was cradled and visualized by the post-industrial imagination of CHU; The Black Country, tech savvy, rule-breaking, progressive wordsmith and thinker – an ardent advocate of aerosol painting and its vanguard for over 30 years with global public works and murals, 3D perspective illusions and many group shows, under his Walsall leather belt. CHU’s work has included projects with Banksy and Jamie Hewlett among many others, and he has been described as the ‘Escher of UK street art’ and founder of Graffiti Bastards.

John Sinclair - Mohawk back cover

The album is beautifully packaged in a double gatefold cd wallet with artwork by CHU in full colour and a ten page booklet. Mohawk illustrates the kind of care and attention a John Sinclair record deserves. After all, he kinda helped start this underground art explosion.

The words here poured forth after cannablissed talking-poet John Sinclair stared at the moon when jazz giant Thelonious Monk died in 1982. The luminous lunar loom inspired Sinclair to create a series of poems about early Monk, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie: “Lest we forget these are young men…bursting with the joy of discovery.” Sinclair lifts up the proverbial bandstand (per Monk’s mandate) with tales of the birth of bop at Monroe’s Uptown House and the jazz/Beat connection. Drummer/composer Steve Fly creates a hip-hopped be-bopped bed of rhythmic sound. (And the bonus track at the end has a Beatle on it!) – Michael Simmons

All Press Enquiries Sean Newsham: sean@mutante-inc.demon.co.uk

CHU talks about his artwork for John Sinclair – Mohawk here: http://www.schudio.co.uk/blog/2014/mohawk-by-john-sinclair/

John Sinclair – Mohawk CD released on Iron Man Records 24th March 2014 Buy It Here

Listen to: The John Sinclair Freedom Rally: John Sinclair Radio Show 526

ARTIST: John Sinclair
TITLE: Mohawk
LABEL: Iron Man Records
FORMAT: CD Double Gatefold Sleeve / Digital
RELEASE DATE: 24th March 2014
FILE UNDER: Rock
Cat No: IMB6022

Buy It Here from Cargo Distribution Direct: http://cargorecordsdirect.co.uk/products/john-sinclair-mohawk

Buy Books and Music by John Sinclair in the Iron Man Shop here: http://ironmanrecords.bigcartel.com

Visit John Sinclair: http://www.johnsinclair.us

Visit Steve Fly: http://acrillic.blogspot.co.uk

Visit Chu: http://www.schudio.co.uk
John Sinclair - Mohawk CD Gatefold back

Free The Weed 40 by John Sinclair

June 21, 2014

John Sinclair - 12 Bar Club, 11th May 2014

Highest greetings from the Mediterranean coast of Italy, where I’m visiting my friends Jerry Poynton and Helen Oliver Adelson, the great American painter, at their rustic place in the countryside outside of Tarquiia, Italy, just an hour north and west of Rome.

I flew in from Amsterdam through an incredible storm that cleared up just before we landed at Leonardo da Vinci airport, but now I’m relaxing in the bucolic serenity of the Etruscan countryside and enjoying the radio program (#553) I made at the 420 Café before leaving Amsterdam that’s posted on my internet radio station at www.RadioFreeAmsterdam.com.

Radio Free Amsterdam has been my leading passion in life for the past 10 years since Henk Botwinik, the late Larry Hayden and I collaborated at the Café Amnesia in Amsterdam to bring it into existence on November 22, 2004. The station has grown from our initial offering, The John Sinclair Radio Show, to two hours of daily programming of blues, jazz, R&B, gospel, soul and weirdness emanating from our website.

I left you last month with my radio station playing in my dream coffeeshop in Detroit and I’ve been wanting to write about Radio Free Amsterdam in my column here for quite some time—but first let’s enjoy our Official Opening Tokes and a word from our sponsor:

As all hedonists know, marijuana is a sensitizing agent that helps increase the user’s awareness of his or her physical being while also gently expanding the mental consciousness as well. Thus one FEELS more and is more AWARE of the sensations one is feeling.

A marijuana high may also promote feelings of general well-being which in turn stimulate the awareness of pleasant physical sensations that may pass through the mind and body while high.

Marijuana also helps the smoker focus on certain feelings and other aspects of reality to the exclusion of others, so that the smoker may TUNE IN to the important things and TUNE OUT of the less pleasant.

Something should also be said about the benevolent effects of marijuana ingestion on listening to music, especially the correct sort of music that really makes you high when you listen to it. And the better the smoke, the more finely and perfectly one may tune in to the sound and what the musicians are saying when they play.

To complete the circle, there must be mentioned the beneficial effect of such music on the act of making love and the circumstances surrounding it, and the synergism generated by the conjunction of good weed, good music and good loving.

In the immortal words of Clifton Chenier in his classic Specialty 78 called “Squeezebox Boogie”: “Put your legs up, baby….Yeah, that’s what I’m talkin’ about.”

I know I’ve said this before, but when I was growing up in Flint, Michigan it was the music on the radio that opened our eyes and ears to a world beyond the puny one we had been given—a world where people sang about what was on our minds and expressed themselves in ways and sounds we had never imagined.

This music created the very air we breathed and the thought waves that animated our burgeoning intelligence. It was the perfect soundtrack for our lives, and we couldn’t live without it.

When I went on to college I was introduced to further extensions of the music I’d heard as a teenager and I loved it even more. I tuned in to jazz stations in Detroit and Chicago and heard music that vibrated throughout my being and stimulated my gradually opening mind to reach out for more and more knowledge and deeper and deeper wellsprings of feeling and emotion.

When I first started smoking weed early in 1962 I was amazed at how much better everything good was beginning to sound and feel. On my 21st birthday my friend and mentor, Tom Allen, who had turned me on to weed in the first place, gifted me with a small bag of pot he’d grown himself somewhere on the banks of the Flint River, and I was mentally propelled into new territory where I began to feel and understand the music I was listening to in a whole new way.

The life I enjoy now, more than 50 years later, started that day when I heard what Miles Davis & John Coltrane were really saying on their current recording called Someday My Prince Will Come. As I paid closer and closer attention to the music I began to understand that it all part of the same thing. Blues & jazz had developed together in the last days of the 19th century, both deeply rooted in the spiritual music of the rural African American church and the cultural matrix of West Africa and the Caribbean.

These intertwined roots and their many musical branches progressed together through the entirety of the 20th century and into the present era, making life worthwhile for millions of music lovers and establishing standards of emotional depth and breadth of intellection and individual artistic expression that will stand as long as there is music.

There’s no mistaking the extent to which these musics have been informed by the ingestion of marijuana and other recreational substances. Marijuana was popularized among musicians and listeners in the 1920s by jazz artists like Louis Armstrong, Mezz Mezzrow and their magic ilk, and the culture of weed smoking was spread through countless recordings by jazz and swing musicians of the 1930s until marijuana was criminalized by the federal government in 1937.

In the 1940s and ‘50s the smell of weed and its positive effect on the intellectual and emotional development of humans committed to artistic expression spread from jazz musicians throughout the artistic community, from poets and writers to painters and photographers to dancers and choreographers to actors and directors and and movie-makers.

The mass popularity of weed reached its early zenith in the sixties, when it was hard to find any segment of the musical and artistic community that had escaped its impact. Since then it’s permeated the culture at large until at last a majority of Americans are in favor of legalizing the sacrament once and for all.

When you tune in to Radio Free Amsterdam you’ll gain the benefit of this entire historical sweep and encounter hours upon hours of creative, pleasurable and swinging musical examples of the greatness of our music and its practitioners. Every week original blues programs by Bruce Pingree, Leslie Keros, Scott Barretta, Tom Morgan, Cary Wolfson, and Harry Duncan are joined with jazz programming by Steve The Fly, Tom Morgan, David Kunian and myself as well as my own idiosyncratic mixtures and the unrelenting weirdness of Caleb Selah to offer a listening experience you can’t really get anywhere else—and it all comes at absolutely no cost to the listener.

I put this music up on the RFA website—sponsored by the Hempshopper stores and Ceres Seed Company of Amsterdam—in order to keep the music alive in its original forms and introduce it to people of today. Our slogan is “Blues, Jazz & Reffer” and we keep it coming week after week. If you punch the button called “Listen Now” you can hear a continuous stream of one-hour programs that will keep your ears throbbing and your mind smiling around the clock.

Give us a listen and light up and be somebody, as the old-time vipers used to say. Free The Weed!

—Tarquinia, Italy
June 21, 2014

© 2014 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

Free The Weed 39 – by John Sinclair

May 25, 2014

John Sinclair at 12 Bar Club, London, Sunday 11th May 2014

Highest greetings from London, where it’s still a crime to smoke and possess cannabis products and the medical use of marijuana is not yet recognized by the forces of the Crown. Like the guy at Customs told me a couple of years ago when he seized my medically prescribed cannabis in its official Dutch medical container and refused my offer to present my Dutch prescription and my Michigan medical marijuana card: “This is just smuggling drugs to us.”

I’m in London to mark the release of my new album MOHAWK from Ironman Records and play a couple of little gigs with my drummer and comrade Steve The Fly, who produced the album for me in Amsterdam and is here with me for the month where we’re guests of Caleb Selah and The Fuck You Sound internet radio studios in the Blackheath sector of southeast London.

We’re in good hands here and our medical and recreational needs are being well attended, and that’s a very good thing. At the end of the month I’ll be enjoying the great honor of opening for Marshall Allen & The Sun Ra Arkestra at the Sun Ra Centennial concert at the Barbican Centre—one of the highest points of my performing arts career, now in its 50th year, and I’m very happy to be here.

But I have to confess that I’m looking forward to fulfilling my artistic duties here and moving on to my favorite roost, the beautiful city of Amsterdam, where my daily life is centered on the coffeeshop called the 420 Café located right in the center of the city. I’m the Poet In Residence at the 420 when I’m in town and I take my post there just about every afternoon, plug in my laptop, have a coffee and roll a joint, greet my friends, conduct my correspondence, record my radio shows and work on scheduling and posting the programs for my internet radio station, RadioFreeAmsterdam.com.

As a poet, writer, internet broadcaster and public intellectual fueled by art, information, marijuana and espresso, there’s no better place for me than the 420 Café to hang out and get my work done without interruption or discomfort. In my travels and in daily life, all I need to keep up with my work is a place with Wi-Fi to plug in and work my keyboard, and I’m usually hunched over my MacBook at a table in somebody’s kitchen as a guest in their home, but it’s far more satisfying for me to be able to take care of my little business in a public setting where I can quietly fit in to the flow of humanity around me and feel more like a human being myself.

Since I left New Orleans in 2003 to try to base myself in Amsterdam I haven’t had a home of my own, and after my first 60 years residing in a series of apartments and houses while I found my way in life, married, had children, remarried, gained more children and somehow got them all through the Detroit public schools, then moved to New Orleans and spent 12 years in residence there with my wife Penny, I was ready for something different.

A house fire in New Orleans in 2000 burnt up my most prized possessions, my music and book collections, and with the counseling of my Buddhist friends I learned to live without them. I set out for Amsterdam a couple of years later with “a suitcase stuffed with clothing / & a bag full of manuscripts / & hand-burnt CDs.” My wife was settled in Detroit attending to her aging mother while I went ahead to try to make a place for us across the Atlantic Ocean, but it turned out she didn’t like it there and decided to stay in Detroit. So I left the furniture and all my other possessions there with her and kept on with my quest to establish myself in a strange—but very comfortable—new place with very few material encumbrances.

After a lifetime as a tenant with familial responsibilities I was on my own in a foreign land without a housing budget or any visible means of support, suddenly dependent on my friends and sympathizers for a place to sleep and the means of survival. Twelve years in New Orleans living by my wits as a music writer, performer, community radio broadcaster and slash-&-burn barnstorming bard had produced barely enough remuneration to keep up with the rent, and I concluded that if I had to starve in New Orleans, I could just as well try to starve in Amsterdam where at the very least I wouldn’t have to be worrying about the police and nobody was armed.

So I starved for several years until I could get my footing, but the 420 Café has sustained me throughout my entire occupation of Amsterdam and provided me with a stable base from which to operate, ensure my survival, make new friends, and keep up with my self-imposed workload. They play music that you can listen to, my own tunes are on the playlist, the splendid staff of the 420 has furnished some of my closest friends, and I’m always made to feel more than welcome in the warm, comfortable environs of this old-school cannabis café.

The great thing about the cannabis café culture is that there’s one for everybody. There used to be 750 coffeeshops in Amsterdam, but even with the continual shrinkage mandated by the government over the past 20 years there are still more than 200 operating coffeeshops that cater to every stripe of the smoking community. Each has its own distinctive ambience, its own musical direction, its own menu of weed and hash, its own non-alcoholic drink specialties, and its own idiosyncratic clientele.

There are coffeeshops in far-flung neighborhoods for the local tokers, many varied spots in the Centrum for touring smokers of every origination, hard-rock coffeeshops, joints that play house music, rap, reggae, jazz and classic rock. If you’re a resident or a regular visitor, you choose your favorite hang and fall in whenever you want to. It’ll have the menu you want to pick from, the music you want to hear and the patrons you want to be with, or you move on to another place that looks like where you want to be at.

As a life-long daily marijuana smoker, this is my idea of civilization. In my old age I’ve managed to arrange my affairs so I can get to stay in Amsterdam for about half the year, traveling to London and around Europe to perform as requested and returning to the States to visit my daughters and granddaughters, do enough work to keep paying my way, and stay in touch with what my hundreds of friends in Detroit and New Orleans and all around the country are doing to make life more interesting all the time.

One of my brightest dreams remains to establish a coffeeshop like this in Detroit where the laws would now allow it, a place where registered marijuana patients could come, present their cards, take a seat at the table of their choice, have a coffee or a juice or a soft drink with their friends, and light up and be somebody while the music of Radio Free Amsterdam is played continuously as the appropriate soundtrack for the setting.

I’m out of space for this month but think about how great that will be when it finally happens. Free The Weed!

London
May 25, 2014
© 2014 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

The Nightingales – For Fuck’s Sake – New LP available April 2014

February 14, 2014

The Nightingales - For Fuck's Sake - New LP available April 2014

In September 2013 the Nightingales recorded a new album at Faust Studio in Germany.

Having been dumped by their fourth consecutive label, following the release of one album each, the group are self releasing the new LP on their own terms.

No interference or outside opinions, no label, no distributor, no catalogue number, no bar code or logo shit, blah blah.

“For Fucks Sake” is an 180g vinyl LP, containing twelve songs & comes packaged in a beautiful matt varnish gatefold sleeve (& inner bag) featuring five original art works by brilliant Scarborough based artist David Yates.

The LP is a limited edition of 600 copies & will be available for pre-order up until 9 April 2014, after which it will only be available at Nightingales gigs.

Download coupon included.

You can buy Nightingales CDs and Vinyl from Iron Man Records on eBay here or Big Cartel here

or Pre-order “For Fuck’s Sake” from the band themselves here http://nightingales.bigcartel.com/
UK – £18 inc p&p
Rest of the World – £21 inc mailing & paypal charges
From 9 April available at Nightingales gigs only

Side 1
Bullet For Gove
Diary Of A Bag Of Nerves
The Gruesome Threesome
Toasted On Both
The Abstract Dad
Good Morning & Goodbye

Side2
His Family Has Been Informed
Dumb & Drummer
Thick & Thin
Contempt
Same Old
Good Morning Midnight

NIGHTINGALES Live radio session – Marc Riley Show, BBC 6Music – Tues 15 April 19.00hrs

NIGHTINGALES + TED CHIPPINGTON – UK TOUR April 2014

Wed 9 – NORWICH, Arts Centre
Thu 10 – WOLVERHAMPTON, Slade Rooms + Jump The Shark
Fri 11 – BRISTOL, The Thunderbolt
Sat 12 – MARGATE, Tom Thumb Theatre
Wed 16 – CAMBRIDGE, Portland Arms + Kepler + Motor Tapes
Thu 17 – LONDON, The Borderline
Fri 18 – LIVERPOOL, East Village Arts Club
Sat 19 – SCARBOROUGH, The Spa Pub + Crumplehorns
Sun 20 – HULL, Adelphi
Mon 21 – DERBY, The Hairy Dog
Tue 22 – MANCHESTER, Kraak
Wed 23 – GLASGOW, Nice N Sleazy
Thu 24 – NEWCASTLE, The Cluny
Fri 25 – EDINBURGH, Citrus Club + Phil Vickers & The Leg
Sat 26 – BRADFORD, 1 In 12 Club + The Family Elan – Benefit for www.bradfordwomensaid.org
Sun 27 – BRIGHTON, Prince Albert + Helen McCookerybook

See www.thenightingales.org.uk for ticket info

FREE NIGHTINGALES DOWNLOADS
There are currently two free downloads from the ‘Gales ‘Covers Club’ available at http://thenightingales.bandcamp.com/

These two tracks are the group’s takes on songs by Joanna Newsom (“Book Of Right On”) and Christy & Emily (“Ghost”)

If you download a song you also become part of the Nightingales mailing list so you will get to hear about any band news before it is posted online

www.facebook.com/thenightingalesuk

https://twitter.com/@_Nightingales

Tour Management and Vehicle Hire

January 6, 2014

I work as a Tour Manager Email or Call Mark: (+44) 07974 746810

I can be found in or around Birmingham, Cardiff and London.

Luxury Splitter Vans for Hire- Driving You Crazy 2012

My work is based around Tour Management in the Music Industry but I also work with the Theatre and Film Industry.

I can help with: Merchandise, Production, Backline, Crew, Rehearsal, Recording, Press, Promotion, Online strategy and equipment storage.

Luxury Splitter Vans for Hire- Driving You Crazy 2012
Driving / TM Services

I have played in all sorts of bands myself over the years, I’ve organised 1000’s of gigs as I used to put on regular shows in Birmingham, I’ve set up tours, managed bands, put together press kits, PR and promotion strategies, worked out online strategies for artists big and small, I run a record label, and I’ve dealt with all sorts of madness along the way. I have an understanding of most problems, pressures and issues that performers and their crew may face. I’ve taken a lot of people to a lot of gigs from living rooms, small venues, squats, warehouses, TV and Radio Stations to major music venues and festivals of all shapes and sizes.

I have a clean driving licence with a C1 and D1 which means I can tow trailers and drive any van or splitter.

Vehicles

I’m a freelance. I work for you, not the hire company. This means that if you employ me I can find you a good vehicle or trailer or anything else you might need so that’s less work you have to do. I can source Splitters, Gear vans, Cars, Minibuses…anything you might need.

Online Strategy

I have an active interest in the internet and social media. If you’re interested in how I could help with your, or your artist’s on-line presence get in touch.

Rates

I charge per day. A day is 8 hours, after the first 8 hours I charge per hour. The hours run from when I collect the vehicle for the work until I return it.

Alternatively, I also charge a ‘set day rate’. This is negotiable depending on what you want me to do. Longer term clients tend to be on a set day rate, It works out cheaper and no one has to watch the clock.

I expect PDs and buyout/catering on any work where I’m away overnight, and buyout/catering on any day over 8 hours.

Some recent Artists / Clients

Seasick Steve, John Paul Jones, Madness, The Stone Roses, Mika, Killing Joke, John Sinclair, Adam Ant, Roland Gift, Fatoumata Diawara, Anthrax, Modestep, Talib Kweli, Little Barrie, House of Pain, The Enemy, Friendly Fires, Crystal Castles, Bullet for my Valentine, The Orb, Barry Adamson, Vagina Monologues, Taio Cruz, Jay Reatard, Nightingales, Ivo Papasov, Sierra Meastra, Endbutt Lane, The Rakes, The Magistrates, Soulsavers, As I lay Dying, Roisin Murphy, Police Bastard, Dufus, Arrows, Ladytron, Son de la Frontera, Jeffrey Daniel, Johnny 2 Bad, XOVA, Johnny Foreigner and many others…..

(Long Wheel VW Crafter Splitter Van shown above is an example of the type of vehicle I most often use when working with Clients.)

The Nightingales – October Tour Dates 2013

October 2, 2013

Tues 22 Oct – WOLVERHAMPTON, Slade Rooms, supporting The Wedding Present

& the following gigs with our mate & special guest TED CHIPPINGTON

Thurs 24 Oct – LONDON, Guided Missile Club @ Buffalo Bar, ‘John Peel Night’ w/ King Champion Sound + Dream Themes

Fri 25 Oct – SCARBOROUGH, The Spa, ‘John Peel Night’ benefit for www.mind.org.uk w/ Crumplehorns

Sat 26 Oct – PRESTON, Pavilion Cafe (Avenham Park), ‘John Peel All Dayer’ w/ Lovely Eggs, The Primitives, The Wolfhounds & others

Sun 27 Oct – BIRMINGHAM, Hare & Hounds (Kings Heath), w/ The Courtesy Group + support TBC

For London & Preston ticket info see the Nightingales Facebook page

A new Nightingales album was recorded in early September at Faust Studio for release in early 2014

Ted Chippington 10″ vinyl EP ‘Blues Fan’ available via http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Iron-Man-Shop

www.facebook.com/ted.chippington

Crumplehorns 7″ vinyl single ‘Simon Says’ b/w ‘Harold’s Eye’ on Big Print to be released on October 24

www.facebook.com/Crumplehorns

www.facebook.com/thenightingalesuk

www.thenightingales.org.uk

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